Catalytic partial oxidation reforming of hydrocarbon fuels.

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The polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is the primary candidate as the power source for light-duty transportation systems. On-board conversion of fuels (reforming) to supply the required hydrogen has the potential to provide the driving range that is typical of today's automobiles. Petroleum-derived fuels, gasoline or some distillate similar to it, are attractive because of their existing production, distribution, and retailing infrastructure. The fuel may be either petroleum-derived or other alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol, natural gas, etc. [1]. The ability to use a variety of fuels is also attractive for stationary distributed power generation [2], such as in ... continued below

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7 p.

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Ahmed, S. September 21, 1998.

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Description

The polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is the primary candidate as the power source for light-duty transportation systems. On-board conversion of fuels (reforming) to supply the required hydrogen has the potential to provide the driving range that is typical of today's automobiles. Petroleum-derived fuels, gasoline or some distillate similar to it, are attractive because of their existing production, distribution, and retailing infrastructure. The fuel may be either petroleum-derived or other alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol, natural gas, etc. [1]. The ability to use a variety of fuels is also attractive for stationary distributed power generation [2], such as in buildings, or for portable power in remote locations. Argonne National Laboratory has developed a catalytic reactor based on partial oxidation reforming that is suitable for use in light-duty vehicles powered by fuel cells. The reactor has shown the ability to convert a wide variety of fuels to a hydrogen-rich gas at less than 800 C, temperatures that are several hundreds of degrees lower than alternative noncatalytic processes. The fuel may be methanol, ethanol, natural gas, or petroleum-derived fuels that are blends of various hydrocarbons such as paraffins, olefins, aromatics, etc., as in gasoline. This paper will discuss the results obtained from a bench-scale (3-kWe) reactor., where the reforming of gasoline and natural gas generated a product gas that contained 38% and 42% hydrogen on a dry basis at the reformer exit, respectively.

Physical Description

7 p.

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OSTI as DE00010729

Medium: P; Size: 7 pages

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  • 1998 Fuel Cell Seminar, Palm Springs, CA (US), 11/16/1998--11/19/1998

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  • Report No.: ANL/CMT/CP-96059
  • Grant Number: W-31109-ENG-38
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 10729
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc619206

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  • September 21, 1998

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  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • April 11, 2017, 3:08 p.m.

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Ahmed, S. Catalytic partial oxidation reforming of hydrocarbon fuels., article, September 21, 1998; Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc619206/: accessed September 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.