Modeling the wind-fields of accidental releases with an operational regional forecast model

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The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an operational emergency preparedness and response organization supported primarily by the Departments of Energy and Defense. ARAC can provide real-time assessments of atmospheric releases of radioactive materials at any location in the world. ARAC uses robust three-dimensional atmospheric transport and dispersion models, extensive geophysical and dose-factor databases, meteorological data-acquisition systems, and an experienced staff. Although it was originally conceived and developed as an emergency response and assessment service for nuclear accidents, the ARAC system has been adapted to also simulate non-radiological hazardous releases. For example, in 1991 ARAC responded to three major events: ... continued below

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4 p.

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Albritton, J.R.; Lee, R.L. & Sugiyama, G. September 11, 1995.

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Description

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an operational emergency preparedness and response organization supported primarily by the Departments of Energy and Defense. ARAC can provide real-time assessments of atmospheric releases of radioactive materials at any location in the world. ARAC uses robust three-dimensional atmospheric transport and dispersion models, extensive geophysical and dose-factor databases, meteorological data-acquisition systems, and an experienced staff. Although it was originally conceived and developed as an emergency response and assessment service for nuclear accidents, the ARAC system has been adapted to also simulate non-radiological hazardous releases. For example, in 1991 ARAC responded to three major events: the oil fires in Kuwait, the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines, and the herbicide spill into the upper Sacramento River in California. ARAC`s operational simulation system, includes two three-dimensional finite-difference models: a diagnostic wind-field scheme, and a Lagrangian particle-in-cell transport and dispersion scheme. The meteorological component of ARAC`s real-time response system employs models using real-time data from all available stations near the accident site to generate a wind-field for input to the transport and dispersion model. Here we report on simulation studies of past and potential release sites to show that even in the absence of local meteorological observational data, readily available gridded analysis and forecast data and a prognostic model, the Navy Operational Regional Atmospheric Prediction System, applied at an appropriate grid resolution can successfully simulate complex local flows.

Physical Description

4 p.

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INIS; OSTI as DE96002689

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  • 9. joint American Meteorological Society/Air and Waste Management Association conference on applications of air pollution meteorology, Atlanta, GA (United States), 28 Jan - 2 Feb 1996

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  • Other: DE96002689
  • Report No.: UCRL-JC--122178
  • Report No.: CONF-960127--4
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 134994
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc618297

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  • September 11, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • Feb. 19, 2016, 12:19 p.m.

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Albritton, J.R.; Lee, R.L. & Sugiyama, G. Modeling the wind-fields of accidental releases with an operational regional forecast model, article, September 11, 1995; California. (https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc618297/: accessed May 21, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, https://digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.