Inherent Problems Associated with the Identification of Genes Responsible for Allowing B. cepacia to Adhere to Human Lung Carcinoma A549 Cells

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In this project a bacteria's ability to bind to human lung tissue was investigated. To carry out this study Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Eschericia coli and Burkholderia cepacia were used. B. cepacia served as the bacterium of interest. Isolating the gene which confers upon this bacterium the ability to bind to lung tissue was the main objective of this study. P. aeruginosa has been identified as being the bacteria most responsible for causing serious lung infections that can result in cystic fibrosis. This bacterium therefore served as the positive control in this study. On the contrary, E. coli does not possess this ... continued below

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Nesty, Gilda S. May 2001.

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  • Nesty, Gilda S.

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Description

In this project a bacteria's ability to bind to human lung tissue was investigated. To carry out this study Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Eschericia coli and Burkholderia cepacia were used. B. cepacia served as the bacterium of interest. Isolating the gene which confers upon this bacterium the ability to bind to lung tissue was the main objective of this study. P. aeruginosa has been identified as being the bacteria most responsible for causing serious lung infections that can result in cystic fibrosis. This bacterium therefore served as the positive control in this study. On the contrary, E. coli does not possess this binding ability and served as the negative control. This paper gives a detailed outline of the different procedures necessary for the successful completion of this project. Firstly, a broad guideline of the important steps involved are explored. This is followed by a discussion on potential problems and possible solutions. Throughout the document, illustrations of expected results are indicated so as to further guide the researcher.

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UNT Student Graduate Works

This collection houses graduate student works other than theses and dissertations. All materials have been previously accepted by a professional organization or approved by a faculty mentor. The collection includes, but is not limited to problems in lieu of thesis, supplemental files associated with theses and dissertations, posters, recitals, presentations, articles, reviews, book chapters, and artwork. Some items in this collection are restricted to use by the UNT community.

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  • May 2001

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 24, 2008, 6:20 p.m.

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  • March 24, 2016, 4:14 p.m.

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Nesty, Gilda S. Inherent Problems Associated with the Identification of Genes Responsible for Allowing B. cepacia to Adhere to Human Lung Carcinoma A549 Cells, thesis, May 2001; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc5819/: accessed December 13, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .