Attachment Processes, Stress Processes, and Sociocultural Standards in the Development of Eating Disturbances in College Women Metadata

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Title

  • Main Title Attachment Processes, Stress Processes, and Sociocultural Standards in the Development of Eating Disturbances in College Women

Creator

  • Author: Bradford, Jennifer Wolf
    Creator Type: Personal

Contributor

  • Chair: Petrie, Trent A.
    Contributor Type: Personal
    Contributor Info: Major Professor
  • Committee Member: Riggs, Shelley
    Contributor Type: Personal
  • Committee Member: Cogan, Karen D.
    Contributor Type: Personal
  • Committee Member: Neumann, Craig S.
    Contributor Type: Personal

Publisher

  • Name: University of North Texas
    Place of Publication: Denton, Texas

Date

  • Creation: 2006-12
  • Digitized: 2008-04-22

Language

  • English

Description

  • Content Description: Minimal empirical research using longitudinal data to explore integrative models of eating disorder development exists. The purpose of this study was to further explore multidimensional models incorporating parental attachment, history of stress, appraisal/coping processes, internalization of the thin-ideal, negative affect, body image, and eating disordered behavior using prospective, longitudinal data. The models were evaluated using 238 participants who completed an initial series of self-report questionnaires during their first semester in college and completed follow-up questionnaires 6 months and 18 months later. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the relationships among the factors. Analyses confirmed that college freshman with insecure parental attachment relationships and those with a history of previous stressful experiences appraised the adjustment to college as more stressful and reported feeling less able to cope with the transition; these conditions predicted increased negative affect and increased eating disturbances. Women who reported experiencing negative affect and those that endorsed internalization of the thin-ideal also reported higher levels of body dissatisfaction; these women engaged in more disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. A second model investigating negative affect as mediating the relationship between the appraisal/coping process and eating disturbances also revealed that experiencing difficulties with the transition to college predicted later negative mood states. Further, women who reported increased negative affect also reported increased eating disturbances. Finally, cross-lagged and simultaneous effects between selected factors were evaluated. Results from these analyses are mixed, but they provide additional information about the predictive relationships among factors that play a role in the development of eating disorders. The results of this study provide valuable information about the development of eating disorders that can be used to aid prevention and treatment. Examination of these models in a large independent sample might provide confirmation of these relationships, and investigation of the models during different developmental periods might also provide important information about the development of eating disturbances and those individuals who are most at risk.

Subject

  • Library of Congress Subject Headings: Eating disorders in women.
  • Library of Congress Subject Headings: Women college students -- Psychology.
  • Keyword: eating disorders
  • Keyword: college adjustment
  • Keyword: parental attachment
  • Keyword: sociocultural influences
  • Keyword: longitudinal
  • Keyword: structural equation modeling

Collection

  • Name: UNT Theses and Dissertations
    Code: UNTETD

Institution

  • Name: UNT Libraries
    Code: UNT

Rights

  • Rights Access: public
  • Rights License: copyright
  • Rights Holder: Bradford, Jennifer Wolf
  • Rights Statement: Copyright is held by the author, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved.

Resource Type

  • Thesis or Dissertation

Format

  • Text

Identifier

  • OCLC: 123903410
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc5477

Degree

  • Degree Name: Doctor of Philosophy
  • Degree Level: Doctoral
  • Degree Discipline: Counseling Psychology
  • Academic Department: Department of Psychology
  • Degree Grantor: University of North Texas

Note