Harvard, Again: Considering Articulation and Accreditation in Rhetoric and Composition's History

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This article discusses considerations in articulation and accreditation in rhetoric and composition's history.

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29 p.

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Skinnell, Ryan March 13, 2014.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Arts and Sciences to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 45 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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This article discusses considerations in articulation and accreditation in rhetoric and composition's history.

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29 p.

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Abstract: First-year composition emerged at Harvard largely because of administrative attempts to address institutional, as opposed to pedagogical, issues. In particular, Harvard administrators sought to improve articulation with public high schools in order to increase enrollments, attract new populations of students, and retain matriculants. First-year composition provided a mechanism for doing so. Because of first-year composition’s value for articulation, it was endorsed by accreditation associations and consequently spread across the country as accreditation did. Articulation and accreditation were not expressly concerned with writing instruction, but they ultimately had profound effects on the development of writing instruction in American higher education.

This is the author manuscript version of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in Rhetoric Review. Copyright 2014 Taylor & Francis.

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  • Rhetoric Review, 2014, New York: Taylor & Francis, pp. 95-112

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  • Publication Title: Rhetoric Review
  • Volume: 33
  • Issue: 2
  • Page Start: 95
  • Page End: 112
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • March 13, 2014

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  • May 29, 2015, 9:36 p.m.

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Skinnell, Ryan. Harvard, Again: Considering Articulation and Accreditation in Rhetoric and Composition's History, article, March 13, 2014; [New York, New York]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc505762/: accessed December 15, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.