Who Cares If Rhetoricians Landed on the Moon? Or, a Plea for Reviving the Politics of Historiography

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This article discusses a plea for reviving the politics of historiography.

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28 p.

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Skinnell, Ryan March 26, 2015.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Arts and Sciences to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 87 times , with 7 in the last month . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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This article discusses a plea for reviving the politics of historiography.

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28 p.

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Abstract: Most historical research in rhetorical studies is underwritten by an imperative to “broaden” the field’s historical horizons—to seek out overlooked, underrepresented, or excluded subjects. This “broadening imperative” is commonly aligned with revisionary historiography, which became a tool for historians to critique disciplinary values during the canon wars of the 1980s and 1990s. However, due to political and intellectual shifts in recent decades, “broadening” has become a preservative act to strengthen the field’s ideological values rather than a critical one to examine them. Ultimately, if historians value the radical perspective of “revisioning,” it is necessary to reinvest in critical historiography.

This is the author manuscript version of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in Rhetoric Review. Copyright 2015 Taylor & Francis.

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  • Rhetoric Review, 2015, New York: Taylor & Francis, pp. 111-128

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  • Publication Title: Rhetoric Review
  • Volume: 34
  • Issue: 2
  • Page Start: 111
  • Page End: 128
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • March 26, 2015

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  • May 29, 2015, 9:36 p.m.

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Skinnell, Ryan. Who Cares If Rhetoricians Landed on the Moon? Or, a Plea for Reviving the Politics of Historiography, article, March 26, 2015; [New York, New York]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc505696/: accessed December 13, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.