A Comparison of the Effectiveness of the Intensive and Concurrent Scheduling Plans for Teaching First-Semester English Composition in the Community College

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The purpose of this study was to observe the differences in English achievement, critical-thinking ability, and attitude toward subject attributable to two scheduling approaches -- "Concurrent" and "Intensive"--in the teaching of first-semester freshman English composition to community college students. Further, the study was initiated in order to provide factual information as a basis for administrative and instructional judgments affecting future planning for accelerated scheduling at the experimental institution. Two classes of first-semester freshman English composition, meeting three hours weekly for fifteen weeks, comprised the control group (Concurrent); two classes of first-semester freshman English composition, meeting nine hours weekly for five ... continued below

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vii, 123 leaves

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Allen, Floyd A. August 1974.

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  • Allen, Floyd A.

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Description

The purpose of this study was to observe the differences in English achievement, critical-thinking ability, and attitude toward subject attributable to two scheduling approaches -- "Concurrent" and "Intensive"--in the teaching of first-semester freshman English composition to community college students. Further, the study was initiated in order to provide factual information as a basis for administrative and instructional judgments affecting future planning for accelerated scheduling at the experimental institution. Two classes of first-semester freshman English composition, meeting three hours weekly for fifteen weeks, comprised the control group (Concurrent); two classes of first-semester freshman English composition, meeting nine hours weekly for five weeks, comprised the experimental group (Intensive). The same form of three criterion instruments was administered to both groups before and after the experimental treatment. The instruments were the Cooperative English Expression Test, the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal, and the Purdue Attitude Scale, Part A -- Attitude Toward Any Subject. Three instructors were involved in the experiment during the fall and spring semesters of the 1973-74 school year. Conventional methods of instruction, using the same course of study, were duplicated in all situations. Statistical analyses utilized in the study were analysis of covariance and multiple linear regression. It was felt that Intensive scheduling was superior to Concurrent as a means of promoting student-faculty harmony. Also, the frustrations experienced within the traditional classroom situation could be lessened by granting greater freedom from the constraints of hourly schedules and competing classes. With tensions reduced, English proficiency could be increased. Acting upon these suppositions, three hypotheses--related to each of the criterion measures-- were formulated. All hypotheses stated that the adjusted post-test scores for the experimental groups would be significantly greater than the adjusted post-test scores for the control groups. The results of the experiment, however, showed no significant difference for any of the hypotheses at the . 05 level of confidence; thus, all were rejected. Within the limitations of this study, it was evident that any difference in the effectiveness of the two scheduling approaches for first-semester freshman composition was negligible. But of significance was the observation that a quality instructional program could be effectively adapted to scheduling variations. In general, the successful implementation of any such variation was dependent upon careful course planning and widespread publicity. Furthermore, attitudes toward a subject did not seem to be materially altered as a result of differences in scheduling format. Pertinent to the improvement of the English discipline, the study revealed a strong correlation between critical-thinking ability and skill in English expression. It appeared, however, that class attendance was more important in the improvement of English skill--especially in accelerated classes--than it was in the improvement of critical-thinking ability. In conclusion, the possibilities of an expanded academic program should be fully investigated as a scheduling option for the community college. In this connection, continuing research should examine the effects of various combinations of grouping plans upon learning. Related goals and objectives should be formulated and program particulars transmitted to students. Available data, defining the type of student most likely to benefit from scheduling options, should be utilized in an effort to create a more favorable total situation.

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vii, 123 leaves

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  • August 1974

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  • March 9, 2015, 8:15 a.m.

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  • Feb. 24, 2017, 11:51 a.m.

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Allen, Floyd A. A Comparison of the Effectiveness of the Intensive and Concurrent Scheduling Plans for Teaching First-Semester English Composition in the Community College, dissertation, August 1974; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc500985/: accessed April 24, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .