A Model for a Humanized Work Climate, and the Effects of Occupation Choice and Education Level on Students' Attitudes Toward an Operational Definition of Such a Climate

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This investigation determines students' attitudes toward a "humanized" work climate. The possibility that attitudes developed before entering the labor force contribute to the lack of such environments is the basis of the research design. A review of motivation theories, relevant research and experiences of some "humanized" firms precedes the development of a model for a humanized climate. The three main elements of the model--team activity, the product, and the self-concept--are interconnected by elements such as self-control, job performance, autonomy, goal definition, and learning. The research questionnaire, a thirty-onestatement, Likert-type instrument, elicits attitudes about the time-task aspect of Kahn's "Work-Module." A ... continued below

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viii, 196 leaves: ill.

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Graham, John C. (John Campbell), 1930- 1974.

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  • Graham, John C. (John Campbell), 1930-

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Description

This investigation determines students' attitudes toward a "humanized" work climate. The possibility that attitudes developed before entering the labor force contribute to the lack of such environments is the basis of the research design. A review of motivation theories, relevant research and experiences of some "humanized" firms precedes the development of a model for a humanized climate. The three main elements of the model--team activity, the product, and the self-concept--are interconnected by elements such as self-control, job performance, autonomy, goal definition, and learning. The research questionnaire, a thirty-onestatement, Likert-type instrument, elicits attitudes about the time-task aspect of Kahn's "Work-Module." A Cronbach Alpha Coefficient of 0.74 indicates an acceptable reliability. The subjects, all male, were seventy senior business students at North Texas State University, fifty-six high school senior academic students from the Richardson, Texas ISD, thirty-two high school vocational students from the Garland, Texas ISD, and twenty-nine college vocational students from the El Centro Branch of the Dallas County Community College System. A 2 x 2 analysis of variance revealed a significant difference (P = 0.0038) between attitudes of vocational and non-vocational students. Vocational students apparently value an autonomous work situation. They prefer a job which permits them to develop and use four or five work skills, because that type of job appeals to their self-concept and promises economic and vocational security. However, students in academic programs consider their economic and job security best protected by structured and specialized jobs. Individuals who aspire to own their own business also prefer the structured climate; others prefer the autonomous environment. The difference in attitude between the two education levels was significant at P < 0.20. The education process appears to be associated with preference for a more structured work climate, in the case of both academic and vocational students. Education also appears to reduce the difference of opinion between academic and vocational students. The study concludes that the two major elements of the human resource begin their work lives with perceptual differences learned from experiences outside the work environment. Organization-change activities are impeded, and to some extent controlled, by these differences. The relationship of the attitudes, given the traditional manager-employee relationship, can contribute to the scarcity of "humanized" firms.

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viii, 196 leaves: ill.

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UNT Theses and Dissertations

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  • 1974

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  • March 9, 2015, 8:15 a.m.

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  • Feb. 20, 2017, 10:29 a.m.

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Graham, John C. (John Campbell), 1930-. A Model for a Humanized Work Climate, and the Effects of Occupation Choice and Education Level on Students' Attitudes Toward an Operational Definition of Such a Climate, dissertation, 1974; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc500817/: accessed April 26, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .