[Fish-Eye View]

Description

Narrative by Junebug Clark: Additional photos and information can be found in the pdf document "Joe Clark HBSS LIFE Magazine Photos" page 16. February 27, 1950. Life Magazine. pages 102-103. Fish-Eye View. Michigan Perch get rare look at ice fishermen. Fish-Eye View Joe Clark HBSS Tawas, Michigan 1950 Winter late 1949 my father, Joe Clark HBSS, received a call from the photo editor of LIFE magazine. "Every year we get about twenty stories on ice fishing, but all the pictures are the same. We know there is something interesting going on, but we just don't have any interesting pictures," he ... continued below

Physical Description

1 photograph : b&w ; 16 x 20 in.

Creation Information

Clark, Joe 19uu.

Context

This photograph is part of the collection entitled: Clark Family Photography Collection and was provided by UNT Libraries Special Collections to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this photograph can be viewed below.

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Description

Narrative by Junebug Clark: Additional photos and information can be found in the pdf document "Joe Clark HBSS LIFE Magazine Photos" page 16. February 27, 1950. Life Magazine. pages 102-103. Fish-Eye View. Michigan Perch get rare look at ice fishermen. Fish-Eye View Joe Clark HBSS Tawas, Michigan 1950 Winter late 1949 my father, Joe Clark HBSS, received a call from the photo editor of LIFE magazine. "Every year we get about twenty stories on ice fishing, but all the pictures are the same. We know there is something interesting going on, but we just don't have any interesting pictures," he said. My father got to thinkin' and realized that he had never seen a picture of "The Fisherman as the Fish Sees him." About this same time my mother, Bernice, came home from the five and dime all excited because she just found and bought something brand new. A sheet of a clear plastic or vinyl that you could place over the dining table that would protect your linen table cloth. She spread it out over the dining room table and hurried down the block to fetch a neighborhood friend to show her "the amazing new find". At the same time Joe was in the bathroom laying a new tile floor and when Bernice returned she was aghast to see a big portion of her new plastic table cover missing and found Joe with that piece glued into a big buble and held together with tile cement and running water over it in the tub. This is a long, but good story so I'll post it in parts. You are about to witness what Joe referred to as "Hillbilly Ingenuity." Please understand that this was before you had undrwater cameras and this was the story as I knew it plus some technical details which I will end this story with. Years later I was with my dad as he was explaing to photographer David Douglas Duncan just how this photo was made. Joe not only came up with this great idea but also he constucted a sort of waterproof housing (The Pretzel-Can-Cam) that shot up at the fishermen, but Joe had also mounted a second Speed Graphic 4x5 camera inside the fishing shanty looking down at the fishermen. But here was what really is amazing and stumped DDD. Joe had drilled holes in the ice and sunk 4 flashbulbs, wrapped in the same plastic, underwater to light the fish below the ice. At that time conventional wisom was that you could only fire one remote flash, tethered by electric wire, to your camera and not for any length beyond eight feet. "How did you do it Joe?" David asked more than once. "hillbilly Ingenuity" is the only answer I heard and know of to this day. ps. Joe also stood outside the shanty for three and a half days waiting for that first fish to take a bite. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. Signed by: Joe Clark, HBSS

Physical Description

1 photograph : b&w ; 16 x 20 in.

Notes

Digitization of this item was sponsored by a grant from The Headliners Foundation.

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Collections

This photograph is part of the following collection of related materials.

Clark Family Photography Collection

This seminal work of visual storytelling represents the extensive Clark family archives from the golden age of American photography. Their work has featured in Life Magazine, National Geographic, Look and Newsweek.

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  • 19uu

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Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Feb. 26, 2015, 12:30 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • June 15, 2017, 10:35 a.m.

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Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Clark, Joe. [Fish-Eye View], photograph, 19uu; (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc499121/: accessed October 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Special Collections.