"Reports of My Death Are Greatly Exaggerated:" Findings from the TEI in Libraries Survey Metadata

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Title

  • Main Title "Reports of My Death Are Greatly Exaggerated:" Findings from the TEI in Libraries Survey

Creator

  • Author: Dalmau, Michelle
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: Indiana University
  • Author: Hawkins, Kevin S.
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of North Texas

Publisher

  • Name: Text Encoding Initiative
    Place of Publication: [Arlington, Massachusetts]

Date

  • Creation: 2015

Language

  • English

Description

  • Content Description: Article on the findings of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) survey of text encoding practices in libraries.
  • Physical Description: 24 p.

Subject

  • Keyword: libraries
  • Keyword: digital libraries
  • Keyword: mass digitization
  • Keyword: text encoding practices

Source

  • Journal: Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative, 2015, Arlington: Text Encoding Initiative

Citation

  • Publication Title: Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative
  • Issue: 8
  • Peer Reviewed: True

Collection

  • Name: UNT Scholarly Works
    Code: UNTSW

Institution

  • Name: UNT Libraries
    Code: UNT

Rights

  • Rights Access: public
  • Rights License: by

Resource Type

  • Article

Format

  • Text

Identifier

  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc488168

Degree

  • Academic Department: Libraries

Note

  • Display Note: Abstract: Historically, academic libraries have contributed to the development of the TEI Guidelines, largely in response to mandates to provide access to and preserve electronic texts, often through authority control, subject analysis, and bibliographic description. But the advent of mass digitization efforts involving simple scanning of pages and OCR called into question such a role for libraries in text encoding. This paper presents the results of a survey targeting library employees to learn more about text encoding practices and to gauge current attitudes toward text encoding.
  • Display Note: This is the preprint version of an article forthcoming in the Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative.