Detection and Quantification of Engineered Proanthocyanidins in Transgenic Plants

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Article on the detection and quantification of engineered proanthocyanidins in transgenic plants.

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9 p.

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Peel, Gregory J. & Dixon, R. A. May 25, 2007.

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Article on the detection and quantification of engineered proanthocyanidins in transgenic plants.

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9 p.

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Abstract: Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are oligomeric plant natural products mostly derived from epicatechin and/or catechin monomers. In studies aimed at engineering PAs into plant tissues that do not naturally make these compounds, we have expressed PA biosynthetic and regulatory genes in tobacco, alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and the model legume Medicago truncatula. Because engineered tannins may be produced in small quantities and it is often necessary to screen many independent plant lines, we have developed an improved, highly sensitive method to quantify and determine the composition of oligomeric PAs in plant extracts. The method involves normal-phase HPLC separation of semi-purified PAs followed by post-column reaction with the PA-specific reagent DMACA (dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde). This procedure allows for accurate and sensitive quantification of individual oligomeric PAs and, unlike currently used methods, does not require exhaustive sample preparation and clean-up. Compositional data are shown for genetically engineered PAs in tobacco and alfalfa.

Source

  • Natural Product Communications, 2007, Westerville: Natural Product Communications, Inc., pp. 1009-1014

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Publication Information

  • Publication Title: Natural Product Communications
  • Volume: 2
  • Issue: 10
  • Page Start: 1009
  • Page End: 1014
  • Pages: 6
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

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  • April 12, 2007

Accepted Date

  • May 25, 2007

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  • May 25, 2007

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Jan. 22, 2015, 9:04 a.m.

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Peel, Gregory J. & Dixon, R. A. Detection and Quantification of Engineered Proanthocyanidins in Transgenic Plants, article, May 25, 2007; [Westerville, Ohio]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc488160/: accessed June 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.