Anthocyanidin reductases from Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana

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Article on anthocyanidin reductases from Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana.

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12 p.

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Xie, De-Yu; Sharma, Shashi B. & Dixon, R. A. February 1, 2004.

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Article on anthocyanidin reductases from Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana.

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12 p.

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Abstract: Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR), encoded by the BANYULS gene, is a newly discovered enzyme of the flavonoid pathway involved in the biosynthesis of condensed tannins. ANR functions immediately downstream of anthocyanidin synthase to convert anthocyanidins into the corresponding 2,3-cis-flavan-3-ols. We report the biochemical properties of ANRs from the model legume Medicago truncatula (MtANR) and the model crucifer Arabidopsis thaliana (AtANR). Both enzymes have high temperature optima. MtANR uses both NADPH and NADH as reductant with slight preference for NADPH over NADH. In contrast, AtANR only uses NADPH and exhibits positive cooperativity for the co-substrate. MtANR shows preference for potential anthocyanidin substrates in the order cyanidin > pelargonidin > delphinidin, with typical Michaelis–Menten kinetics for each substrate. In contrast, AtANR exhibits the reverse preference, with substrate inhibition at high concentrations of cyanidin and pelargonidin. (+)-Catechin and (±)-dihydroquercetin inhibit AtANR but not MtANR, whereas quercetin inhibits both enzymes. Possible catalytic reaction sequences for ANRs are discussed.

Copyright © 2004 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003986103006763

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  • Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 2004, Amsterdam: Elsevier Science Ltd., pp. 91-102

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  • Publication Title: Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics
  • Volume: 422
  • Issue: 1
  • Page Start: 91
  • Page End: 102
  • Pages: 12
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

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  • November 19, 2003

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  • December 5, 2003

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  • February 1, 2004

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  • Jan. 22, 2015, 9:04 a.m.

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Xie, De-Yu; Sharma, Shashi B. & Dixon, R. A. Anthocyanidin reductases from Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana, article, February 1, 2004; [Amsterdam, Netherlands]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc488134/: accessed September 24, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.