The relationship between the MCMI-III and the MMPI-2 in a chronic pain population.

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The purpose of the present study was to study the relationship of MCMI-III clinical scales with MMPI-2 clusters in a chronic pain population. Data was obtained through assessment data (N = 242) from the Dallas Spinal Rehabilitation Center (DSRC), that included MMPI-2 and MCMI-III, as well as pre-and post-assessment information (n = 21) and follow-up questionnaires (n = 19). Subjects' age ranged from 18 to 64. Each patient had a primary diagnosis related to a back and/or a cervical injury, a chronic pain diagnosis, and often medical prescription dependency and/or addition. Each has experienced back pain in the lumbar region ... continued below

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Hardie, John C. December 2004.

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  • Hardie, John C.

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The purpose of the present study was to study the relationship of MCMI-III clinical scales with MMPI-2 clusters in a chronic pain population. Data was obtained through assessment data (N = 242) from the Dallas Spinal Rehabilitation Center (DSRC), that included MMPI-2 and MCMI-III, as well as pre-and post-assessment information (n = 21) and follow-up questionnaires (n = 19). Subjects' age ranged from 18 to 64. Each patient had a primary diagnosis related to a back and/or a cervical injury, a chronic pain diagnosis, and often medical prescription dependency and/or addition. Each has experienced back pain in the lumbar region (L1 to L5) or cervical region (C1 to C7) for an average of 32 months. Patients with thoracic (mid-spine) and carpal tunnel pain were excluded from this study. A multivariate cluster analysis procedure was performed that yielded 3 homogeneous female MMPI-2 clusters and 4 MMPI-2 homogeneous male clusters. Seven multiple regression analyses were performed to determine which MCMI-III clinical scales predicted cluster membership in the MMPI-2 clusters. Results indicated that MCMI-III clinical scales "7" Compulsive, "X" Validity and "C" Borderline were predictors for membership in the male MMPI-2 clusters. Membership in the female MMPI-2 clusters were predicted by MCMI-III clinical scales "4" Histrionic, "T" Drug Dependence and "2A" Avoidant. Nineteen pre-and post-MCMI-IIIs were analyzed for change after participants completed the six-week pain management program. Paired-sample t-tests were performed on these data and revealed that significant change was noted on 10 MCMI-III clinical scales. Follow-up data questionnaires were available on these same individuals. Results from a correlation analysis indicated that patients who reported having supportive relationships with their spouse and family and a secure source of income report better quality of sleep, better mood, are able to relax and are believe that they are able to manage their pain. Participants who were able to relax and remain calm report better quality of sleep, exercise frequently, report better quality of mood and believe that they will return to work soon. Findings from this study suggest that rather than using the MCMI-III as a diagnostic tool, a more efficient use of this instrument would be to understand maladaptive coping styles that may be present under stressful situations. This study's findings suggest that pain treatment program staff could utilize follow up information, as well as diagnostic information about coping strategies that might appear under stress, to shape interventions. Future research might focus on investigation of factors that predict both improvement and program failure, especially those present at initial intake.

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  • December 2004

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  • Feb. 15, 2008, 3:41 p.m.

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  • Feb. 29, 2008, 2:11 p.m.

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Hardie, John C. The relationship between the MCMI-III and the MMPI-2 in a chronic pain population., dissertation, December 2004; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4703/: accessed September 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .