The Effects of Powerlessness, Fear of Social Change, and Social Integration on Fear of Crime Among the Elderly

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Article on the effects of powerlessness, fear of social change, and social integration on fear of crime among the elderly.

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6 p.

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Eve, Raymond A., 1946- & Eve, Susan Brown 1984.

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Article on the effects of powerlessness, fear of social change, and social integration on fear of crime among the elderly.

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6 p.

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A revised version of a paper presented to the XII International Congress of Gerontology, Hamburg, Germany, July 12-17, 1981. This research was partially supported by funds from The Texas Governor's Committee on Aging and Faculty Research Funds of North Texas State University.

Abstract: The research attempts to explain why many elderly are afraid of crime in circumstances where their actual risk of criminal victimization tends to be low. It was hypothesized that this fear was often a symbolic fear which had its origins in diffuse anxiety concerning the future in a rapidly changing society where the elderly tend to be relatively powerless. Data on a sample of 8,065 adults 60 years of age and older in Texas were analyzed using multiple classification analysis (MCA) techniques. It was found that those elderly in the most powerless categories were, indeed, the most afraid of crime. The respondent's subjective interpretation of their situation were found to be more predictive than were related objective criteria. Secondary social support systems tended to be ineffective in mitigating the fear of victimization but primary support systems were found to be more effective in this regard.

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  • Victimology: An International Journal, 1984, Victimology Inc., pp. 290-295

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  • Publication Title: Victimology: An International Journal
  • Volume: 9
  • Issue: 2
  • Page Start: 290
  • Page End: 295
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • 1984

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  • Dec. 4, 2014, 2:16 p.m.

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Eve, Raymond A., 1946- & Eve, Susan Brown. The Effects of Powerlessness, Fear of Social Change, and Social Integration on Fear of Crime Among the Elderly, article, 1984; (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc461720/: accessed July 23, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Honors College.