Paying for the Arts: Fundraising Methods for Secondary Theater Programs

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Description

This project in lieu of thesis identifies successful methods of fundraising utilized by a sampling of three secondary theater arts programs from North Texas. Programs were evaluated on their ability to fund their programs and provide a quality arts education for their students. Guidelines for fundraising were developed that allow secondary theater programs to flourish without placing an additional burden on already overextended tax system. Findings were framed in a Marxist socio-economic context, seeking to find some relation between supply-side economics and the failure of certain communities to offer quality arts programs. Marxist philosophy, emphasizing the values of community and ... continued below

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Soward, David B. August 2003.

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This thesis is part of the collection entitled: UNT Student Graduate Works and was provided by UNT Libraries to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 94 times . More information about this thesis can be viewed below.

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  • Soward, David B.

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Description

This project in lieu of thesis identifies successful methods of fundraising utilized by a sampling of three secondary theater arts programs from North Texas. Programs were evaluated on their ability to fund their programs and provide a quality arts education for their students. Guidelines for fundraising were developed that allow secondary theater programs to flourish without placing an additional burden on already overextended tax system. Findings were framed in a Marxist socio-economic context, seeking to find some relation between supply-side economics and the failure of certain communities to offer quality arts programs. Marxist philosophy, emphasizing the values of community and shared wealth, served to frame findings in the context of arts programs serving and enhancing their own communities.

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UNT Student Graduate Works

This collection houses graduate student works other than theses and dissertations. All materials have been previously accepted by a professional organization or approved by a faculty mentor. The collection includes, but is not limited to problems in lieu of thesis, supplemental files associated with theses and dissertations, posters, recitals, presentations, articles, reviews, book chapters, and artwork. Some items in this collection are restricted to use by the UNT community.

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  • August 2003

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Feb. 15, 2008, 2:56 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • March 21, 2016, 4:25 p.m.

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Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Soward, David B. Paying for the Arts: Fundraising Methods for Secondary Theater Programs, thesis, August 2003; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc4250/: accessed September 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .