Environmental journalism curriculum as an imperative of democracy: A philosophical exploration.

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Economic retrenchment, social shifts, and technological changes endanger journalism's democratic role. Journalism education faces parallel threats. I review the state of journalism and education, linking the crisis to society's loss of story, framed philosophically by the Dewey-critical theory split over journalism and power. I explore the potential for renewing journalism and education with Carey's ritual model and Postman's restoration of storytelling. I then summarize existing major academic programs and suggest a new interdisciplinary curriculum for environmental journalism, a specialty well suited to experimental, democracy-centered education. The curriculum uses as pedagogy active and conversational learning and reflection. A graduate introductory course ... continued below

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Loftis, Randy Lee August 2007.

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  • Loftis, Randy Lee

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Economic retrenchment, social shifts, and technological changes endanger journalism's democratic role. Journalism education faces parallel threats. I review the state of journalism and education, linking the crisis to society's loss of story, framed philosophically by the Dewey-critical theory split over journalism and power. I explore the potential for renewing journalism and education with Carey's ritual model and Postman's restoration of storytelling. I then summarize existing major academic programs and suggest a new interdisciplinary curriculum for environmental journalism, a specialty well suited to experimental, democracy-centered education. The curriculum uses as pedagogy active and conversational learning and reflection. A graduate introductory course is detailed, followed by additional suggested classes that could form the basis of a graduate certificate program or, with further expansion, a graduate degree concentration.

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  • August 2007

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  • Jan. 14, 2008, 11:14 p.m.

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  • Oct. 9, 2008, 11:41 a.m.

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Loftis, Randy Lee. Environmental journalism curriculum as an imperative of democracy: A philosophical exploration., thesis, August 2007; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc3944/: accessed September 25, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .