The Development of Interests in Children with Autism: A Method to Establish Baselines for Analyses and Evaluation Metadata

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Title

  • Main Title The Development of Interests in Children with Autism: A Method to Establish Baselines for Analyses and Evaluation

Creator

  • Author: Ala'i-Rosales, Shahla
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of North Texas
  • Author: Zeug, Nicole M.
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of Kansas
  • Author: Baynham, Tanya Y.
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of Kansas

Publisher

  • Name: Association for Behavior Analysis. Developmental Behavior Analysis Special Interest Group
    Place of Publication: [Portage, Michigan]

Date

  • Creation: 2008

Language

  • English

Description

  • Content Description: This article discusses development of interests in children with autism.
  • Physical Description: 15 p.

Subject

  • Keyword: autism
  • Keyword: children
  • Keyword: early intervention programs

Source

  • Journal: Behavioral Development Bulletin, 2008, Portage: Association for Behavior Analysis. Developmental Behavior Analysis Special Interest Group, pp. 3-16

Citation

  • Publication Title: Behavioral Development Bulletin
  • Volume: 14
  • Edition: Spring
  • Page Start: 3
  • Page End: 16
  • Pages: 15
  • Peer Reviewed: True

Collection

  • Name: UNT Scholarly Works
    Code: UNTSW

Institution

  • Name: UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service
    Code: UNTCPA

Rights

  • Rights Access: public

Resource Type

  • Article

Format

  • Text

Identifier

  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc39320

Degree

  • Academic Department: Behavior Analysis

Note

  • Display Note: Abstract: By definition, children with autism have limited interests. While considerable efforts have been directed toward the social and communication difficulties faced by children with autism, less attention has been directed towards understanding the development and acquisition of new interests. Such understanding may help autism interventionists-establish increasingly diverse and complex interests thereby increasing reinforcing events, learning opportunities, activity participation, and social engagement. This paper describes an observational system for monitoring reinforcer diversity and event engagement during naturalistic teaching portions of an early intervention program. Data are presented for two children. It is suggested that such measures are necessary for two reasons. First, given the lack of empirical support and the importance of reinforcers, there is a need for measurement systems to monitor the development of interests in early intervention programs for children with autism. Second, there is a paucity of research addressing expansion of interests. Developing measurement systems increases the likelihood that evidence-based practices will emerge. Hopefully, these efforts will increase our knowledge, increase child preference for instruction, and open avenues for enhanced instructional and life opportunities based on expanded interests.