Renunciation and Non-Renunciation in Indian Films

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Article discussing the renunciation and non-renunciation in Indian films. The author reviews several films to analyze the portrayal of ascetics and householders.

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9 p.

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Jain, Pankaj 2010.

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Article discussing the renunciation and non-renunciation in Indian films. The author reviews several films to analyze the portrayal of ascetics and householders.

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9 p.

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Abstract: Renunciation is one of the most widely studied subjects among Indic traditions. The image of a half-naked ascetic with a stick in one hand and a begging bowl in other has captured the attention of scholars more often than the mundane householder. Whereas the ascetic captured the imagination with his (and sometimes her) individualistic spirit rebelling against the maligned caste hierarchy, the householder has been seen as a poor creature living a routine life according to the rules dictated by the caste (varna) and the stage in life (ashrama). The author reviews several films to analyze the portrayal of ascetics and householders, but cannot claim that the review is encyclopedic because there are so many films with variations on this theme. All of the films introduced here were made by Indian filmmakers except for two Hollywood films, the Householder (1963) and Siddhartha (1972), that were filmed in India with an Indian cast and story.

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  • Religion Compass, 2010, Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, pp. 157-165

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  • Publication Title: Religion Compass
  • Volume: 5
  • Page Start: 157
  • Page End: 165
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

The Scholarly Works Collection is home to materials from the University of North Texas community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and serves as UNT's Open Access Repository. It brings together articles, papers, artwork, music, research data, reports, presentations, and other scholarly and creative products representing the expertise in our university community.** Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.**

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  • 2010

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  • July 13, 2011, 11:32 a.m.

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  • May 23, 2014, 10:47 a.m.

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Jain, Pankaj. Renunciation and Non-Renunciation in Indian Films, article, 2010; [Hoboken, New Jersey]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc38893/: accessed February 26, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service.