Botulinum Toxin Suppression of CNS Network Activity In Vitro

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Article on botulinum toxin suppression of CNS network activity in vitro.

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10 p.

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Pancrazio, Joseph J.; Gopal, Kamakshi V.; Keefer, Edward W. & Gross, Guenter W. February 12, 2014.

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Article on botulinum toxin suppression of CNS network activity in vitro.

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10 p.

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Abstract: The botulinum toxins are potent agents which disrupt synaptic transmission. While the standard method for BoNT detection and quantification is based on the mouse lethality assay, we have examined whether alterations in cultured neuronal network activity can be used to detect the functional effects of BoNT. Murine spinal cord and frontal cortex networks cultured on substrate integrated microelectrode arrays allowed monitoring of spontaneous spike and burst activity with exposure to BoNT serotype A (BoNT-A). Exposure to BoNT-A inhibited spike activity in cultured neuronal networks where, after a delay due to toxin internalization, the rate of activity loss depended on toxin concentration. Over a 30 hr exposure to BoNT-A, the minimum concentration detected was 2 ng/mL, a level consistent with mouse lethality studies. A small proportion of spinal cord networks, but not frontal cortex networks, showed a transient increase in spike and burst activity with exposure to BoNT-A, an effect likely due to preferential inhibition of inhibitory synapses expressed in this tissue. Lastly, prior exposure to human-derived antisera containing neutralizing antibodies prevented BoNT-A induced inhibition of network spike activity. These observations suggest that the extracellular recording from cultured neuronal networks can be used to detect and quantify functional BoNT effects.

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  • Journal of Toxicology, 2014, Nasr City: Hindawi Publishing Corporation

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Publication Information

  • Publication Title: Journal of Toxicology
  • Volume: 2014
  • Pages: 10
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

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  • July 20, 2013

Accepted Date

  • October 22, 2013

Creation Date

  • February 12, 2014

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 29, 2014, 2:16 p.m.

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Pancrazio, Joseph J.; Gopal, Kamakshi V.; Keefer, Edward W. & Gross, Guenter W. Botulinum Toxin Suppression of CNS Network Activity In Vitro, article, February 12, 2014; [Nasr City, Cairo]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc333018/: accessed August 16, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.