An Osmoreceptive Zone Around the Nucleus Circularis

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The nucleus circularis has been linked to a role in regulating osmotic thirst but evidence has also shown that full bilateral destruction of the nucleus circularis was not necessary to achieve a deficit in drinking behavior after an osmotic challenge. The present study attempted to answer two primary research questions. The first question was whether osmoreceptive cells existed around the nucleus circularis in a homogeneous fashion or if these cells existed in a structured fashion stretching from the nucleus circularis forward. The second question was whether animals with lesions of the nucleus circularis and the surrounding areas were different in ... continued below

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vi, 46 leaves: ill.

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Wallace, Forrest Layne August 1985.

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  • Wallace, Forrest Layne

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The nucleus circularis has been linked to a role in regulating osmotic thirst but evidence has also shown that full bilateral destruction of the nucleus circularis was not necessary to achieve a deficit in drinking behavior after an osmotic challenge. The present study attempted to answer two primary research questions. The first question was whether osmoreceptive cells existed around the nucleus circularis in a homogeneous fashion or if these cells existed in a structured fashion stretching from the nucleus circularis forward. The second question was whether animals with lesions of the nucleus circularis and the surrounding areas were different in normal daily water intake than animals with no lesions. The first question was approached by lesioning the nucleus circularis, the area one millimeter anterior to the nucleus circularis, one millimeter posterior to the nucleus circularis, one half of a millimeter medial to the nucleus circularis and using a sham group which had the electrode passed through the brain to a spot one millimeter above the nucleus circularis but passing no current. All animals were then given an osmotic challenge which consisted of half of each group with an injection of hypertonic saline while the other half of each group was given isotonic saline. After a five-day recovery period, the injection procedure was reversed. Water consumption on each test day was measured at ten-minute intervals for one hour. Difference scores were then computed by subtracting the amount of water consumed after hypertonic saline injection from the amount of water consumed after isotonic saline injection. The difference scores were then used in an analysis of variance which revealed a significant difference between groups. A subsequent post hoc test showed that the nucleus circularis group was different from all other groups except for the anterior lesion group which showed a trend in the same direction as the nucleus circularis group. The second research question was approached in two ways. The first way was to simply record the amount of water consumed in each twenty-four hour period. An analysis of variance showed no significant difference between any of the groups. The second method for testing the second research question was to put the animals on a twenty-three hour water deprivation schedule and measure the amount of water consumed during the one hour when water was available. Once again, no significant differences were observed.

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vi, 46 leaves: ill.

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  • August 1985

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  • Aug. 22, 2014, 6 p.m.

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  • May 4, 2016, 1:27 p.m.

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Wallace, Forrest Layne. An Osmoreceptive Zone Around the Nucleus Circularis, dissertation, August 1985; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc332316/: accessed August 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .