The Influence of Social Network Graph Structure on Disease Dynamics in a Simulated Environment

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The fight against epidemics/pandemics is one of man versus nature. Technological advances have not only improved existing methods for monitoring and controlling disease outbreaks, but have also provided new means for investigation, such as through modeling and simulation. This dissertation explores the relationship between social structure and disease dynamics. Social structures are modeled as graphs, and outbreaks are simulated based on a well-recognized standard, the susceptible-infectious-removed (SIR) paradigm. Two independent, but related, studies are presented. The first involves measuring the severity of outbreaks as social network parameters are altered. The second study investigates the efficacy of various vaccination policies based ... continued below

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ix, 91 p. : ill., maps

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Johnson, Tina V. December 2010.

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This dissertation is part of the collection entitled: UNT Theses and Dissertations and was provided by UNT Libraries to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 502 times , with 4 in the last month . More information about this dissertation can be viewed below.

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  • Johnson, Tina V.

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Description

The fight against epidemics/pandemics is one of man versus nature. Technological advances have not only improved existing methods for monitoring and controlling disease outbreaks, but have also provided new means for investigation, such as through modeling and simulation. This dissertation explores the relationship between social structure and disease dynamics. Social structures are modeled as graphs, and outbreaks are simulated based on a well-recognized standard, the susceptible-infectious-removed (SIR) paradigm. Two independent, but related, studies are presented. The first involves measuring the severity of outbreaks as social network parameters are altered. The second study investigates the efficacy of various vaccination policies based on social structure. Three disease-related centrality measures are introduced, contact, transmission, and spread centrality, which are related to previously established centrality measures degree, betweenness, and closeness, respectively. The results of experiments presented in this dissertation indicate that reducing the neighborhood size along with outside-of-neighborhood contacts diminishes the severity of disease outbreaks. Vaccination strategies can effectively reduce these parameters. Additionally, vaccination policies that target individuals with high centrality are generally shown to be slightly more effective than a random vaccination policy. These results combined with past and future studies will assist public health officials in their effort to minimize the effects of inevitable disease epidemics/pandemics.

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ix, 91 p. : ill., maps

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UNT Theses and Dissertations

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  • December 2010

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 4, 2011, 1:11 p.m.

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  • Jan. 15, 2014, 2:59 p.m.

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Johnson, Tina V. The Influence of Social Network Graph Structure on Disease Dynamics in a Simulated Environment, dissertation, December 2010; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc33173/: accessed July 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .