Managerial Problem Definition: A Descriptive Study of Problem Definers

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

This research examines problem definition as the first step in a sequential problem solving process. Seventy-seven managers in four diverse organizations were studied to determine common characteristics of problem definers. Among the variables considered as differentiating problem definers from non-problem definers were cognitive style, personal need characteristics, preference for ideation, experience, level of management, and type and level of education. Six hypotheses were tested using the following instruments: the Problem Solving Inventory, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Schedule, the Preference for Ideation Scale, the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule, a Problem Definition Exercise, and a Personal Data Questionnaire. Among the managers studied, ... continued below

Physical Description

ii, 136 leaves : ill.

Creation Information

Phillips Danielson, Waltraud August 1985.

Context

This dissertation is part of the collection entitled: UNT Theses and Dissertations and was provided by UNT Libraries to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 152 times , with 25 in the last month . More information about this dissertation can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this dissertation or its content.

Chair

Committee Members

Publisher

Rights Holder

For guidance see Citations, Rights, Re-Use.

  • Phillips Danielson, Waltraud

Provided By

UNT Libraries

The UNT Libraries serve the university and community by providing access to physical and online collections, fostering information literacy, supporting academic research, and much, much more.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this dissertation. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Degree Information

Description

This research examines problem definition as the first step in a sequential problem solving process. Seventy-seven managers in four diverse organizations were studied to determine common characteristics of problem definers. Among the variables considered as differentiating problem definers from non-problem definers were cognitive style, personal need characteristics, preference for ideation, experience, level of management, and type and level of education. Six hypotheses were tested using the following instruments: the Problem Solving Inventory, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Schedule, the Preference for Ideation Scale, the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule, a Problem Definition Exercise, and a Personal Data Questionnaire. Among the managers studied, only twelve were found to be problem definers. Such small numbers severely limit the ability to generalize about problem definers. However, it is possible that problem definers are scarce in organizations. In terms of cognitive style, problem definers were primarily thinking types who preferred evaluation to ideation in dealing with problems, making judgmental decisions on the basis of collected facts. Problem definers were not predominant at lower levels of the organization. One-third of the problem definers held upper level management positions while another one-fourth were responsible for specialized activities within their organizations, overseeing special projects and individuals much like upper level managers. Sixty-eight of the problem definers had non-business educations with none having more than a bachelors degree. As knowledge and judgment on which to base evaluation expands, managers may become less adept at defining problems and more adept at selecting and implementing alternatives. Several tentative hypotheses can be tested in future research including: 1) determining whether problem definers are scarce in organizations, 2) determining whether problem definers are more prevalent in some types of organizations than others, 3) verifying unique cognitive and personal need characteristics, 4) determining whether non-managers rather than managers have problem defining skills.

Physical Description

ii, 136 leaves : ill.

Subjects

Language

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this dissertation in the Digital Library or other systems.

Collections

This dissertation is part of the following collection of related materials.

UNT Theses and Dissertations

Theses and dissertations represent a wealth of scholarly and artistic content created by masters and doctoral students in the degree-seeking process. Some ETDs in this collection are restricted to use by the UNT community.

What responsibilities do I have when using this dissertation?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this dissertation.

Creation Date

  • August 1985

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 22, 2014, 6 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Nov. 21, 2017, 10:15 a.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this dissertation last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 25
Total Uses: 152

Interact With This Dissertation

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Phillips Danielson, Waltraud. Managerial Problem Definition: A Descriptive Study of Problem Definers, dissertation, August 1985; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc331384/: accessed November 12, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .