Improving Adherence: Use of Relapse Prevention Instructions in Clinical Nutrition Programs

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The possibility that faulty expectations about success and relapse recovery contributed to poor adherence was examined in this study. Support for such an expectancy model was sought through comparing an index of relative task magnitude to adherence rates. Instructions designed to improve adherence through changing expectations about relapse and relapse recovery were also administered to 46 clients in two clinical nutritional programs. Their adherence rates <in days) were compared to the rates obtained from the records of 64 other clients who did not receive the instructions. To further understand the adherence phenomenon, several other measures were obtained from the treatment ... continued below

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iv, 105 leaves

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Snowden, James E. (James Edward) December 1986.

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  • Snowden, James E. (James Edward)

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The possibility that faulty expectations about success and relapse recovery contributed to poor adherence was examined in this study. Support for such an expectancy model was sought through comparing an index of relative task magnitude to adherence rates. Instructions designed to improve adherence through changing expectations about relapse and relapse recovery were also administered to 46 clients in two clinical nutritional programs. Their adherence rates <in days) were compared to the rates obtained from the records of 64 other clients who did not receive the instructions. To further understand the adherence phenomenon, several other measures were obtained from the treatment subjects. These data were compared to adherence rates in an attempt to identify potential co-variate relationships. Statistical procedures including analysis of variance to determine comparability of subject groups, Pearson Product Moment correlations, t tests of the difference between means, and the Lawshe—Baker Nomograph comparing per cent adherence rates were performed on the data. Obtained results did not support the predicted relationship between relative task magnitude and adherence. This may have been due to differences between subjective assessments of task magnitude and the objective measure used in this study. Although improvement in adherence was noted in both treatment groups, statistical significance was achieved only in the university based clinic. Differences in the settings, assisting nutritionists, and participating subjects could have produced these findings. However, because improvement did occur in both settings, and because the techniques may be easily and inexpensively utilized by clinical nutritionists, these instructions were recommended for inclusion as a routine component of nutritional clinic procedures. No strong co-variate relationships were found between adherence and the additional measures included in the study. The only variables which correlated with adherence more than trivially, emotional response to a verbal food stimulus, and imaging ability, did lend support for this cognitively active method of improving adherence.

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iv, 105 leaves

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  • December 1986

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  • Aug. 22, 2014, 6 p.m.

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  • May 9, 2016, 1:01 p.m.

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Snowden, James E. (James Edward). Improving Adherence: Use of Relapse Prevention Instructions in Clinical Nutrition Programs, dissertation, December 1986; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc331320/: accessed September 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .