Chemically Active Odorants as Olfactory Probes

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The initial step in odor recognition by the nose is the binding of odorant molecules to receptor sites embedded in the dendritic membranes of olfactory receptor cells. Despite considerable interest and experimentation into the nature of these receptor sites, little is known of their specificity to different types of odorant molecules. This lack of knowledge partially stems from the fact that the nature of receptor proteins is most effectively studied when specific and irreversible inhibitors are available for use as chemical probes, yet no such agents have been discovered for use in the olfactory system. A series of alkylating agents ... continued below

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vi, 135 leaves : ill.

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Criswell, Darrell W. (Darrell Wayne) May 1982.

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  • Criswell, Darrell W. (Darrell Wayne)

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The initial step in odor recognition by the nose is the binding of odorant molecules to receptor sites embedded in the dendritic membranes of olfactory receptor cells. Despite considerable interest and experimentation into the nature of these receptor sites, little is known of their specificity to different types of odorant molecules. This lack of knowledge partially stems from the fact that the nature of receptor proteins is most effectively studied when specific and irreversible inhibitors are available for use as chemical probes, yet no such agents have been discovered for use in the olfactory system. A series of alkylating agents and other chemically active odorants were tested to determine whether they might react with specific odorant receptors and modify olfactory responses. Electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings were obtained before, during, and after treatment of the olfactory mucosae of grass frogs (Rana pipiens) with a chemically active odorant.

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vi, 135 leaves : ill.

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  • May 1982

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  • Aug. 22, 2014, 6 p.m.

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  • June 18, 2018, 1:40 p.m.

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Criswell, Darrell W. (Darrell Wayne). Chemically Active Odorants as Olfactory Probes, dissertation, May 1982; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc331058/: accessed July 20, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .