Adherence/Compliance to Exercise Prescription: A Test of the Self-Efficacy Model

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

It has been well-documented in the literature that there are many physical and psychological benefits to be derived from regular aerobic exercise. It has also been noted that adherence/compliance to aerobic exercise regimens tends to be quite low. Investigators have found that a number of factors tend to correlate with adherence, but it has been difficult thus far to determine a mechanism which underlies a tendency to adhere versus a tendency to drop-out. This study examined the problem of non-adherence from the perspective of Self-Efficacy Theory (Bandura, 1977). Subjects for this investigation included all patients seen during a four week ... continued below

Physical Description

iv, 80 leaves

Creation Information

Lyons, Beth (Beth A.) August 1985.

Context

This dissertation is part of the collection entitled: UNT Theses and Dissertations and was provided by UNT Libraries to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 175 times , with 6 in the last month . More information about this dissertation can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this dissertation or its content.

Chair

Committee Members

Publisher

Rights Holder

For guidance see Citations, Rights, Re-Use.

  • Lyons, Beth (Beth A.)

Provided By

UNT Libraries

The UNT Libraries serve the university and community by providing access to physical and online collections, fostering information literacy, supporting academic research, and much, much more.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this dissertation. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Degree Information

Description

It has been well-documented in the literature that there are many physical and psychological benefits to be derived from regular aerobic exercise. It has also been noted that adherence/compliance to aerobic exercise regimens tends to be quite low. Investigators have found that a number of factors tend to correlate with adherence, but it has been difficult thus far to determine a mechanism which underlies a tendency to adhere versus a tendency to drop-out. This study examined the problem of non-adherence from the perspective of Self-Efficacy Theory (Bandura, 1977). Subjects for this investigation included all patients seen during a four week period in the Cooper Clinic at the Aerobics Center in Dallas, Texas. Patients at the clinic receive a complete physical examination and health prescriptions based upon the results of their examination. During this four week period, half were administered a Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. Approximately three months later all patients seen during this four week period received a followup (adherence questionnaire in the mail). It was hypothesized that there would be a positive relationship between responses on the Self-Efficacy Questionnaire and responses on the Adherence Questionnaire. A second hypothesis stated that there would be a positive relationship between items which specifically pertained to exercise on each of the questionnaires. In addition, it was expected that there would be no difference in adherence rates between those who made self-efficacy judgments and those who did not. Results of a t-test conducted between the group which made self-efficacy judgments and the group that was not asked to make such an evaluation demonstrated no significant difference in adherence rates. A correlational analysis revealed that there was not a statistically significant relationship between total self-efficacy scores and total adherence scores. There was, however, a statistically significant relationship between levels of exercise self-efficacy and levels of exercise adherence. In addition to these main variables of interest, correlations between other variables (sex, age, percent bodyfat, etc.) were examined and discussed.

Physical Description

iv, 80 leaves

Subjects

Language

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this dissertation in the Digital Library or other systems.

Collections

This dissertation is part of the following collection of related materials.

UNT Theses and Dissertations

Theses and dissertations represent a wealth of scholarly and artistic content created by masters and doctoral students in the degree-seeking process. Some ETDs in this collection are restricted to use by the UNT community.

What responsibilities do I have when using this dissertation?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this dissertation.

Creation Date

  • August 1985

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 22, 2014, 6 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Jan. 26, 2018, 4:23 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this dissertation last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 6
Total Uses: 175

Interact With This Dissertation

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Lyons, Beth (Beth A.). Adherence/Compliance to Exercise Prescription: A Test of the Self-Efficacy Model, dissertation, August 1985; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc331015/: accessed November 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .