The Effect of Comparative Well-Being on the Perceived Risk Construct: a Study of the Purchase of Apparel

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The purpose of this research was to examine how the intervening variable of comparative well-being (which is how persons view their age, financial resources, and health compared to others of their own age) will enhance the significance of the relationship between selected demographic and psychographic variables and perceived risk. Specifically, the research investigated the structural relationship between comparative well-being in four different statistical models: (1) as an independent predictor of perceived risk; (2) as an intensifier of the psychographic and demographic predictors of perceived risk; (3) as a covariate of perceived risk; and (4) finally, as a jointly dependent variable ... continued below

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viii, 199 leaves : ill.

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McConkey, C. William (Charles William) December 1987.

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  • McConkey, C. William (Charles William)

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Description

The purpose of this research was to examine how the intervening variable of comparative well-being (which is how persons view their age, financial resources, and health compared to others of their own age) will enhance the significance of the relationship between selected demographic and psychographic variables and perceived risk. Specifically, the research investigated the structural relationship between comparative well-being in four different statistical models: (1) as an independent predictor of perceived risk; (2) as an intensifier of the psychographic and demographic predictors of perceived risk; (3) as a covariate of perceived risk; and (4) finally, as a jointly dependent variable with perceived risk. This approach was pursued in an effort to enhance the traditional marketing use of demographic and psychographic variables in predictingconsumer buying behavior.
The data for this study were gathered as part of a national consumer-panel mail survey utilizing approximately 3,000 households. The research instrument was a self-administered questionnaire which collected demographic, psychographic, and perceived risk information from purchasers of apparel wear. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, Pearson product moment correlation analysis, factor analysis, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA).
The findings have identified the importance of how consumers position themselves in society, based on their locus of external involvement (community and social activity) and how satisfactory their position is in their social structure as measured by comparative well-being (perceived age, income, and health). The research results challenge the value of using only age and income as predictor variables for perceived risk, in that no significant relationships were found between age, income, and perceived risk. However, comparative well-being was found to intensify these relationships, in addition to functioning as an independent variable and a covariate in the perceived risk relationship. Also, it was found that respondents with higher degrees of comparative well-being perceived less risk, whereas, more socially active respondents were high-risk perceivers.

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viii, 199 leaves : ill.

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  • Accession or Local Control No: 1002715261-McConkey
  • Library of Congress Control Number: 379 N81d no.2789
  • UNT Catalog No.: b1419689 | External Link
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc330710

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  • December 1987

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  • Aug. 22, 2014, 6 p.m.

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  • Dec. 14, 2015, 1:10 p.m.

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Citations, Rights, Re-Use

McConkey, C. William (Charles William). The Effect of Comparative Well-Being on the Perceived Risk Construct: a Study of the Purchase of Apparel, dissertation, December 1987; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc330710/: accessed November 19, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .