First evidence of bryophyte diaspores in the plumage of transequatorial migrant birds

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Article on the first evidence of bryophyte diaspores in the plumage of transequatorial migrant birds.

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13 p. : col. ill.

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Lewis, Lily R.; Behling, Emily; Gousse, Hannah; Qian, Emily; Elphick, Chris S.; Lamarre, Jean-François et al. June 12, 2014.

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  • PeerJ
    Place of Publication: [Corte Madera, California]

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Article on the first evidence of bryophyte diaspores in the plumage of transequatorial migrant birds.

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13 p. : col. ill.

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Abstract: Correlations between transequatorial migratory bird routes and bipolar biogeographic disjunctions in bryophytes suggest that disjunctions between northern and southern high latitude regions may result from bird-mediated dispersal; supporting evidence is, however, exclusively circumstantial. Birds disperse plant units (diaspores) internally via ingestion (endozoochory) or externally by the attachment of diaspores to the body (ectozoochory). Endozoochory is known to be the primary means of bird-mediated dispersal for seeds and invertebrates at local, regional, and continental scales. Data supporting the role of bird-mediated endozoochory or ectozoochory in the long distance dispersal of bryophytes remain sparse, however, despite the large number of bryophytes displaying bipolar disjunctions. To determine if transequatorial migrant shorebirds may play a role in the ectozoochory of bryophyte diaspores, we developed a method for screening feathers of wild birds. We provide the first evidence of microscopic bryophyte diaspores, as well as those from non-bryophyte lineages, embedded in the plumage of long distance transequatorial migrant birds captured in their arctic breeding grounds. The number of diaspores recovered suggests that entire migratory populations may be departing their northern breeding grounds laden with potentially viable plant parts and that they could thereby play significant roles in bipolar range expansions of lineages previously ignored in the migrant bird dispersal literature.

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  • PeerJ, 2014, Corte Madera: PeerJ

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  • Publication Title: PeerJ
  • Volume: 2
  • Issue: e424
  • Pages: 13
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • April 8, 2014

Accepted Date

  • May 20, 2014

Creation Date

  • June 12, 2014

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Aug. 20, 2014, 12:25 p.m.

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Lewis, Lily R.; Behling, Emily; Gousse, Hannah; Qian, Emily; Elphick, Chris S.; Lamarre, Jean-François et al. First evidence of bryophyte diaspores in the plumage of transequatorial migrant birds, article, June 12, 2014; [Corte Madera, California]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc330573/: accessed November 14, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.