Self-Objectification Among Physically Active Women Metadata

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Title

  • Main Title Self-Objectification Among Physically Active Women

Creator

  • Author: Greenleaf, Christy
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of North Texas

Publisher

  • Name: Springer
    Place of Publication: [New York, New York]

Date

  • Creation: 2005-01

Language

  • English

Description

  • Content Description: This article discusses self-objectification among physically active women.
  • Physical Description: 12 p.

Subject

  • Keyword: self-objectifications
  • Keyword: body images
  • Keyword: disordered eating

Source

  • Journal: Sex Roles, 2005. New York: Springer, pp. 51-62

Citation

  • Publication Title: Sex Roles
  • Volume: 52
  • Issue: 1/2
  • Page Start: 51
  • Page End: 62
  • Peer Reviewed: True

Collection

  • Name: UNT Scholarly Works
    Code: UNTSW

Institution

  • Name: UNT College of Education
    Code: UNTCED

Rights

  • Rights Access: public

Resource Type

  • Article

Format

  • Text

Identifier

  • DOI: 10.1007/s11199-005-1193-8
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc31088

Degree

  • Academic Department: Kinesiology, Health Promotion, and Recreation

Note

  • Display Note: Abstract: Objectification Theory (Fredrickson & Roberts, 1997) was used to examine (a) the mediation effects of body shame and flow on the relationship between self-objectification and disordered eating, (b) age differences in self-objectification, body shame, flow, and disordered eating, (c) the prediction of physical activity from self-objectification, flow, body shame, and disordered eating, and (d) the relationships between self-objectification, flow, and physical activity. Participants were 394 women ages 18-64. Results revealed that (a) body shame medicated the relationship between self-objectification and disordered eating, (b) younger women reported higher levels of self-objectification, body shame, dieting, and several flow characteristics, (c) older women scored higher on the loss of self-consciousness subscale of the flow measure, and (d) self-objectification was a significant predictor of physical activity.