Transition and gap models of forest dynamics

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Article discussing transition and gap models of forest dynamics.

Physical Description

16 p.

Creation Information

Acevedo, Miguel F.; Urban, D. L. & Ablan, Magdiel November 1995.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Arts and Sciences to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 182 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Authors

Publisher

Provided By

UNT College of Arts and Sciences

The UNT College of Arts and Sciences educates students in traditional liberal arts, performing arts, sciences, professional, and technical academic programs. In addition to its departments, the college includes academic centers, institutes, programs, and offices providing diverse courses of study.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Degree Information

Description

Article discussing transition and gap models of forest dynamics.

Physical Description

16 p.

Notes

Copyright © 1995 the Ecological Society of America.

Abstract: We describe and apply a correspondence between two major modeling approaches to forest dynamics: transition markovian models and gap models or JABOWA-FORET type simulators. A transition model can be derived from a gap model by defining states on the basis of species, functional roles, vertical structure, or other convenient cover types. A gap-size plot can be assigned to one state according to dominance of one of these cover types. A semi-Markov framework is used for the transition model by considering not only the transition probabilities among the states, but also the holding times in each transition. The holding times are considered to be a combination of distributed and fixed time delays. Spatial extensions are possible by considering collections of gap-size plots and the proportions of these plots occupied by each state. The advantages of this approach include: reducing simulation time, analytical guidance to the simulations, direct analytical exploration of hypothesis and the possibility of fast computation from closed-form solutions and formulae. These advantages can be useful in the simulation of landscape dynamics and of species-rich forests, as well as in designing management strategies. A preliminary application to the H. J. Andrews forest in the Oregon Cascades is presented for demonstration.

Source

  • Ecological Applications, 1995, Washington D.C.: Ecological Society of America, pp. 1040-1055

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

Publication Information

  • Publication Title: Ecological Applications
  • Volume: 5
  • Issue: 4
  • Page Start: 1040
  • Page End: 1055
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • November 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 13, 2014, 7:15 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • May 11, 2015, 1:41 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 3
Total Uses: 182

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Acevedo, Miguel F.; Urban, D. L. & Ablan, Magdiel. Transition and gap models of forest dynamics, article, November 1995; [Washington, D.C.]. (https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc303220/: accessed March 23, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, https://digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.