Federal Water Requirements: Challenges to Estimating the Cost Impact on Local Communities

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Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Under the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, commonly referred to as the Clean Water Act, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has responsibility for protecting public health and welfare, as well as the integrity of our nation's waters. Federal water requirements under these acts affect facilities providing the most basic services at the local level, including drinking water treatment plants and distribution systems; wastewater treatment plants and collection systems; and storm sewer systems, which collect storm water, or the runoff created by rainfall ... continued below

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United States. Government Accountability Office. November 30, 2005.

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Description

Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Under the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, commonly referred to as the Clean Water Act, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has responsibility for protecting public health and welfare, as well as the integrity of our nation's waters. Federal water requirements under these acts affect facilities providing the most basic services at the local level, including drinking water treatment plants and distribution systems; wastewater treatment plants and collection systems; and storm sewer systems, which collect storm water, or the runoff created by rainfall and other types of wet weather. For example, depending on the circumstances, local communities may have to pay for installing new treatment technologies or taking other measures so that community-based or regional facilities can meet applicable water quality standards. Nationwide, there are roughly 53,000 community drinking water systems, 17,000 municipal wastewater treatment plants, and 7,000 communities served by municipal storm sewer collection systems that may be affected by federal water requirements. While recognizing the public health and environmental benefits of federal water requirements, communities are increasingly voicing concerns about the financial burden imposed by these requirements--in particular, the projected costs of more recent regulations and their cumulative costs over time. Over the years, EPA, water and community associations, and other parties have developed various estimates of some of the different costs related to ensuring clean water and safe drinking water. Additionally, the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 requires EPA to prepare a written statement identifying the costs and benefits of federal mandates contained in certain regulations. However, the act does not require EPA to identify the cumulative costs and benefits of multiple regulations. As the Congress considers legislation to provide more resources to communities to address regulatory costs and aging water infrastructure, it is seeking a more complete understanding of the federal water requirements affecting local communities and the cumulative costs associated with implementing them. In this context, Congress asked us to determine the cumulative cost of federal water requirements. In conducting this work, we identified some major methodological challenges to developing complete and reliable cost information. This report summarizes the information provided Congress during our November 17, 2005, briefing and formally transmits the charts presented during that briefing. As requested, this report provides information on (1) key federal water requirements that local communities are subject to under the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Clean Water Act, (2) the extent to which existing studies provide information on the cumulative cost of such requirements to communities, and (3) the methodological challenges to developing reliable cumulative cost estimates attributable to federal water requirements."

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Government Accountability Office Reports

The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) is an independent, nonpartisan agency that works for the U.S. Congress investigating how the federal government spends taxpayers' money. Its goal is to increase accountability and improve the performance of the federal government. The Government Accountability Office Reports Collection consists of over 13,000 documents on a variety of topics ranging from fiscal issues to international affairs.

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  • November 30, 2005

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  • June 12, 2014, 7:50 p.m.

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United States. Government Accountability Office. Federal Water Requirements: Challenges to Estimating the Cost Impact on Local Communities, text, November 30, 2005; Washington D.C.. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc299402/: accessed October 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.