Summary Analysis of Federal Commercial Aviation Taxes and Fees

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Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "For 2001 through the third quarter of 2003, the U.S. airline industry reported operating losses of $20.7 billion. A number of factors--including the economic slowdown, a shift in business travel buying behavior, and the aftermath of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks--contributed to these losses by reducing passenger and cargo volumes and depressing fares. To improve their financial position, many airlines cut costs by various means, notably by reducing labor expenditures and by decreasing capacity through cutting flight frequencies, using smaller aircraft, or eliminating service to some communities. ... continued below

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United States. General Accounting Office. March 12, 2004.

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Correspondence issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "For 2001 through the third quarter of 2003, the U.S. airline industry reported operating losses of $20.7 billion. A number of factors--including the economic slowdown, a shift in business travel buying behavior, and the aftermath of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks--contributed to these losses by reducing passenger and cargo volumes and depressing fares. To improve their financial position, many airlines cut costs by various means, notably by reducing labor expenditures and by decreasing capacity through cutting flight frequencies, using smaller aircraft, or eliminating service to some communities. Carriers have also reduced some airfares to encourage travel. Despite these efforts, several airlines filed for bankruptcy protection. It remains to be seen when the industry will emerge from this downturn. In response to the industry's financial condition, Congress has provided several forms of financial relief. In September 2001, Congress passed the Air Transportation Safety and System Stabilization Act, which authorized payments of up to $4.5 billion in pretax cash assistance to reimburse air carriers for losses incurred as a direct result of the 4-day government shut-down of air traffic and incremental losses stemming from the terrorist attacks and also authorized up to $10 billion in loan guarantees to help airlines gain emergency access to capital. In January 2002, Congress appropriated $100 million for new or modified cockpit doors on commercial aircraft to improve security of the flight deck. In the fiscal year 2003 supplemental appropriations act, Congress appropriated $2.4 billion in security cost relief for airlines. To provide information to Congress for its continuing deliberations about whether and, if so, how to provide additional help to the airline industry, we reviewed the payments of major commercial aviation taxes and fees over the last 5 years. The federal government levies or approves various taxes and fees on the commercial aviation industry. These taxes and fees generally are levied as a percentage of the base ticket price or are assessed at a flat rate per occurrence (e.g., per departure or passenger enplanement). The revenues from these taxes and fees support various aspects of the civil aviation system--including operation of the air traffic control system, modernization of airport facilities, and support of aviation security related activities. As requested, we focused on the following research questions: (1) What are the major commercial aviation taxes and fees, how much is collected annually, and how are the proceeds used? (2) How did changes in aviation tax and fee collections compare with changes in the industry's operating revenues and expenses from 1998 through 2002? (3) How has the total amount of aviation taxes and fees paid varied among carriers? (4) In the two instances since 1996 when an aviation tax or fee was not collected, how did airfares change?"

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Government Accountability Office Reports

The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) is an independent, nonpartisan agency that works for the U.S. Congress investigating how the federal government spends taxpayers' money. Its goal is to increase accountability and improve the performance of the federal government. The Government Accountability Office Reports Collection consists of over 13,000 documents on a variety of topics ranging from fiscal issues to international affairs.

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  • March 12, 2004

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  • June 12, 2014, 7:50 p.m.

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United States. General Accounting Office. Summary Analysis of Federal Commercial Aviation Taxes and Fees, text, March 12, 2004; Washington D.C.. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc298672/: accessed September 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.