Bishnoi: An Eco-Theological "New Religious Movement" In The Indian Desert Metadata

Metadata describes a digital item, providing (if known) such information as creator, publisher, contents, size, relationship to other resources, and more. Metadata may also contain "preservation" components that help us to maintain the integrity of digital files over time.

Title

  • Main Title Bishnoi: An Eco-Theological "New Religious Movement" In The Indian Desert

Creator

  • Author: Jain, Pankaj
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of North Texas

Publisher

  • Name: A. Deepak Publishing
    Place of Publication: [Hampton, Virginia]

Date

  • Creation: 2010-08

Language

  • English

Description

  • Content Description: Article discussing research on the Bishnois and an eco-theological "new religious movement" in the indian desert.
  • Physical Description: 20 p.

Subject

  • Keyword: Bishnois
  • Keyword: ecology
  • Keyword: Hinduism
  • Keyword: Muslim
  • Keyword: Islam

Source

  • Journal: Journal of Vaishnava Studies, 2010, Hampton: A. Deepak Publishing, pp. 1-20

Citation

  • Publication Title: Journal of Vaishnava Studies
  • Volume: 19
  • Issue: 1
  • Page Start: 1
  • Page End: 20
  • Peer Reviewed: True

Collection

  • Name: UNT Scholarly Works
    Code: UNTSW

Institution

  • Name: UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service
    Code: UNTCPA

Rights

  • Rights Access: public

Resource Type

  • Article

Format

  • Text

Identifier

  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc29807

Degree

  • Academic Department: Anthropology

Note

  • Display Note: Abstract: Although Rajasthan is the "desert" state in the North West of India, it has been a fertile ground for interreligious interactions for the last several centuries, welcoming or battling the new groups entering South Asia. This article presents the author's fieldwork done with the Bishnois, a Rajasthani community that transcends the boundaries of Hinduism and Islam. Although Bishnois are now considered a caste-group within the Hindu community, they were classified with Muslims in 1891 Census of Marwar. The author notes that despite the several common elements of Hindu and Muslim practices and ideas in this community, at present the Bishnois reject any connection with Islam. The article concludes that this "Hinduization" can be contextualized with similar process taking place with several other "liminal" communities.