Public Housing: New Assessment System Holds Potential for Evaluating Performance

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A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) spends $7 billion annually to provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing for low-income households in about 14,000 rental properties nationwide. Yet, many public housing properties have been unsafe and unsanitary for several decades. To identify and correct these problems, HUD began a Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS) to evaluate the performance of public housing authorities. Although HUD is still testing and revising PHAS, it has begun to designate certain housing authorities as troubled and to assign them to ... continued below

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United States. General Accounting Office. March 15, 2002.

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Description

A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) spends $7 billion annually to provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing for low-income households in about 14,000 rental properties nationwide. Yet, many public housing properties have been unsafe and unsanitary for several decades. To identify and correct these problems, HUD began a Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS) to evaluate the performance of public housing authorities. Although HUD is still testing and revising PHAS, it has begun to designate certain housing authorities as troubled and to assign them to recovery centers, where they receive technical and other assistance. HUD also created the Public and Indian Housing Information Center (PIC) database to collect information on funding, compliance, and other problems that fall outside the scope of PHAS. PHAS includes four performance indicators: (1) the physical condition of the properties, (2) the financial condition of the housing authority, (3) the authority's management operations, and (4) residents' satisfaction with their living conditions. HUD develops a score for each indicator and, starting in this fiscal year, plans to use the scores for all four indicators to determine whether housing authorities are troubled. So far, HUD has used only the management operations score to designate housing authorities as troubled. The PIC risk assessment uses the total PHAS score and information about funding and compliance issues to classify troubled and nontroubled housing authorities as high, moderate, or low risk. According to HUD, the field offices focus their monitoring resources on the nontroubled high-risk authorities in an effort to correct their problems before the authorities are designated as troubled. GAO found inconsistencies between the PHAS and PIC assessment. The five public housing authorities GAO visited, which had not been designated as troubled under PHAS but had been classified as moderate to high risk under PIC, had various problems. However, even under the same authority, some developments were well or adequately maintained, while others had cosmetic, structural, or health and safety problems. HUD may provide technical assistance at a housing authority through either a field office team or a troubled agency recovery center. HUD may also impose sanctions on a housing authority or intervene in its operations to compel the authority to correct problems. For more serious, long-standing problems, HUD may put a housing authority into receivership. In some instances, HUD may enter into special agreements with housing authorities, giving them the flexibility to address unique problems. Although these options have the potential for solving problems at public housing authorities, it is still to early to evaluate their effectiveness. Moreover, in the past, the options have not always fully addressed the problems or the housing authorities have not sustained the improvements. Refer to the accompanying video, Public Housing Today (GAO-02-1040SP)."

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Government Accountability Office Reports

The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) is an independent, nonpartisan agency that works for the U.S. Congress investigating how the federal government spends taxpayers' money. Its goal is to increase accountability and improve the performance of the federal government. The Government Accountability Office Reports Collection consists of over 13,000 documents on a variety of topics ranging from fiscal issues to international affairs.

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  • March 15, 2002

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  • June 11, 2014, 5:03 a.m.

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United States. General Accounting Office. Public Housing: New Assessment System Holds Potential for Evaluating Performance, report, March 15, 2002; Washington D.C.. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc294340/: accessed June 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.