Mercury (Hg2+) suppression of potassium currents of outer hair cells

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Article discussing mercury (Hg2+) suppression of potassium currents of outer hair cells.

Physical Description

11 p.

Creation Information

Liang, Guihua; Järlebark, Leif; Ulfendahl, Mats & Moore, Ernest J. 2003.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Arts and Sciences to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 142 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Authors

Publisher

Provided By

UNT College of Arts and Sciences

The UNT College of Arts and Sciences educates students in traditional liberal arts, performing arts, sciences, professional, and technical academic programs. In addition to its departments, the college includes academic centers, institutes, programs, and offices providing diverse courses of study.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Degree Information

Description

Article discussing mercury (Hg2+) suppression of potassium currents of outer hair cells.

Physical Description

11 p.

Notes

Abstract: The heavy metal mercury (Hg2+) is an insidious environmental pollutant that causes toxic effects on sensory systems. It is well known that the group IIB divalent cation Hg2+ is an inhibitor of the group I monovalent potassium (K+) cation pore-forming channel in several biological preparations. Here, we used the whole cell patch clamp technique on freshly isolated outer hair cells (OHCs) of the guinea pig cochlea to record outward K+ currents and inward K+ currents treated with mercuric chloride (HgCl2). HgCl2 affected K+ currents in a voltage- and dose-dependent manner. The effects of HgCl2 at 1.0–100 μM are more pronounced on onset peak current than on steady-state end current. HgCl2 depolarized also the resting membrane potential. Although the effect of HgCl2 at 1.0 μM was partially washed out over several minutes, the effects at 10 and 100 μM were irreversible to washout. Since K+ channels of OHCs are targets for HgCl2 ototoxicity, this may lead to auditory transduction problems, including a loss in hearing sensitivity. A better understanding of fundamental mechanisms underlying K+ channelopathies in OHCs due to HgCl2 poisoning may lead to better preventive or therapeutic agents.

Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd., all rights reserved. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0892-0362(03)00008-4

Source

  • Neurotoxicology and Teratology, 2003, New York: Elsevier Science Ltd., pp. 349-359

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

Publication Information

  • Publication Title: Neurotoxicology and Teratology
  • Volume: 25
  • Issue: 3
  • Page Start: 349
  • Page End: 359
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • 2003

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 29, 2014, 5:29 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 1, 2015, 3:24 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 142

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Liang, Guihua; Järlebark, Leif; Ulfendahl, Mats & Moore, Ernest J. Mercury (Hg2+) suppression of potassium currents of outer hair cells, article, 2003; [New York, New York]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc287059/: accessed September 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.