Label-free shotgun proteomics and metabolite analysis reveal a significant metabolic shift during citrus fruit development

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Article discussing label-free shotgun proteomics and metabolite analysis revealing a significant metabolic shift during citrus fruit development.

Physical Description

18 p.

Creation Information

Katz, Ehud; Boo, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Ho Youn; Eigenheer, Richard A.; Phinney, Brett S.; Shulaev, Vladimir et al. 2011.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Arts and Sciences to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 292 times , with 7 in the last month . More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Authors

Publisher

Provided By

UNT College of Arts and Sciences

The UNT College of Arts and Sciences educates students in traditional liberal arts, performing arts, sciences, professional, and technical academic programs. In addition to its departments, the college includes academic centers, institutes, programs, and offices providing diverse courses of study.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Degree Information

Description

Article discussing label-free shotgun proteomics and metabolite analysis revealing a significant metabolic shift during citrus fruit development.

Physical Description

18 p.

Notes

Abstract: Label-free LC-MS/MS-based shot-gun proteomics was used to quantify the differential protein synthesis and metabolite profiling in order to assess metabolic changes during the development of citrus fruits. Our results suggested the occurrence of a metabolic change during citrus fruit maturation, where the organic acid and amino acid accumulation seen during the early stages of development shifted into sugar synthesis during the later stage of citrus fruit development. The expression of invertases remained unchanged, while an invertase inhibitor was up-regulated towards maturation. The increased expression of sucrose-phosphate synthase and sucrose-6-phosphate phosphatase and the rapid sugar accumulation suggest that sucrose is also being synthesized in citrus juice sac cells during the later stage of fruit development.

Source

  • Journal of Experimental Botany, 2011, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 5367-5384

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

Publication Information

  • Publication Title: Journal of Experimental Botany
  • Volume: 62
  • Issue: 15
  • Page Start: 5367
  • Page End: 5384
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • 2011

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 29, 2014, 5:29 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 7
Total Uses: 292

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Katz, Ehud; Boo, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Ho Youn; Eigenheer, Richard A.; Phinney, Brett S.; Shulaev, Vladimir et al. Label-free shotgun proteomics and metabolite analysis reveal a significant metabolic shift during citrus fruit development, article, 2011; [Oxford, England]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc287052/: accessed December 17, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.