The Quick and the Dirty: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Database Overlap at the Journal Title Level Metadata

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Title

  • Main Title The Quick and the Dirty: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Database Overlap at the Journal Title Level

Creator

  • Author: Harker, Karen
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of North Texas
  • Author: Kizhakkethil, Priya
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of North Texas

Contributor

  • Organizer of meeting: North American Serials Interest Group
    Contributor Type: Organization

Date

  • Creation: 2014-05-03

Language

  • English

Description

  • Content Description: Presentation for the 2014 North American Serials Interest Group (NASIG) Annual Conference on database overlap at the journal title level.
  • Physical Description: 45 p.

Subject

  • Keyword: web-scale discovery systems
  • Keyword: database assessment tools
  • Keyword: serials management
  • Keyword: indexing

Source

  • Conference: Twenty-Ninth North American Serials Interest Group Annual Conference, 2014, Fort Worth, Texas, United States

Collection

  • Name: UNT Scholarly Works
    Code: UNTSW

Institution

  • Name: UNT Libraries
    Code: UNT

Rights

  • Rights Access: public

Resource Type

  • Presentation

Format

  • Image

Identifier

  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc287050

Degree

  • Academic Department: Libraries

Note

  • Display Note: Annotated PowerPoint (ppt) version of this presentation is available for download.
  • Display Note: Abstract: Given the decreasing budgets for collections at many libraries, librarians are looking at abstracting and indexing (A&I) resources and full-text databases with a more skeptic eye. In addition to traditional evaluation measures, such as costs, usage and faculty input, we looked at the overlap of indexing and/or full-text coverage. Those who have conducted such overlap studies have approached it at either the journal or article level. Article-level overlap studies demonstrate coverage of selected articles in the databases under study. Conversely, journal-level studies examine the extent of indexing of journals among the selected databases. Both methods are very time-consuming and require extensive resources. A simplification of the journal-level method is to compare lists of journals indexed. Two tools, Cufts and JISC's Academic Database Assessment Tool (ADAT) are very useful for this purpose, but do not include all databases. Many databases need to be manually collected. This presentation will describe the background to such a project, the specific tools and procedures used, how the results were used to address budget reductions, and the limitations of the results. Members of the audience will be able to consider using this method for evaluating their own abstract and index databases for budgetary purposes.