A Network Control Theory Approach to Modeling and Optimal Control of Zoonoses: Case Study of Brucellosis Transmission in Sub-Saharan Africa

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Article on a network control theory approach to modeling and optimal control of zoonoses and a case study of brucellosis transmission in sub-Saharan Africa.

Physical Description

15 p.

Creation Information

Roy, Sandip; McElwain, Terry F. & Wan, Yan October 2011.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Engineering to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 205 times , with 9 in the last month . More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Authors

Publisher

Provided By

UNT College of Engineering

The UNT College of Engineering strives to educate and train engineers and technologists who have the vision to recognize and solve the problems of society. The college comprises six degree-granting departments of instruction and research.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Degree Information

Description

Article on a network control theory approach to modeling and optimal control of zoonoses and a case study of brucellosis transmission in sub-Saharan Africa.

Physical Description

15 p.

Notes

Abstract: Background: Developing control policies for zoonotic diseases is challenging, both because of the complex spread dynamics exhibited by these diseases, and because of the need for implementing complex multi-species surveillance and control efforts using limited resources. Mathematical models, and in particular network models, of disease spread are promising as tools for control-policy design, because they can provide comprehensive quantitative representations of disease transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings: A layered dynamical network model for the transmission and control of zoonotic diseases is introduced as a tool for analyzing disease spread and designing cost-effective surveillance and control. The model development is achieved using brucellosis transmission among wildlife, cattle herds, and human sub-populations in an agricultural system as a case study. Precisely, a model that tracks infection counts in interacting animal herds of multiple species (e.g., cattle herds and groups of wildlife for brucellosis) and in human subpopulations is introduced. The model is then abstracted to a form that permits comprehensive targeted design of multiple control capabilities as well as model identification from data. Next, techniques are developed for such quantitative design of control policies (that are directed to both the animal and human populations), and for model identification from snapshot and time-course data, by drawing on recent results in the network control community. Conclusions/Significance: The modeling approach is shown to provide quantitative insight into comprehensive control policies for zoonotic diseases, and in turn to permit policy design for mitigation of these diseases. For the brucellosis-transmission example in particular, numerous insights are obtained regarding the optimal distribution of resources among available control capabilities (e.g., vaccination, surveillance and culling, pasteurization of milk) and points in the spread network (e.g., transhumance vs. sedentary herds). In addition, a preliminary identification of the network model for brucellosis is achieved using historical data, and the robustness of the obtained model is demonstrated. As a whole, our results indicate that network modeling can aid in designing control policies for zoonotic diseases.

Source

  • PLoS One, 2011, San Francisco: Public Library of Science

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

Publication Information

  • Publication Title: PLoS One
  • Volume: 5
  • Issue: 10
  • Pages: 15
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • October 2011

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 29, 2014, 5:29 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Aug. 29, 2014, 10:08 a.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 9
Total Uses: 205

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Roy, Sandip; McElwain, Terry F. & Wan, Yan. A Network Control Theory Approach to Modeling and Optimal Control of Zoonoses: Case Study of Brucellosis Transmission in Sub-Saharan Africa, article, October 2011; [San Francisco, California]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc287037/: accessed November 16, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Engineering.