Preliminary Assessment of the Health and Environmental Impacts of Fluidized-Bed Combustion of Coal as Applied to Electrical Utility Systems

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Description

The objective of this study was to assess the health and environmental impacts of fluidized-bed combustion of coal (FBC), specifically as applied to base-load generation of electrical energy by utilities. The public health impacts of Fluidized-Bed Combustion (FBC) plants are expected to be quite similar to those for Low Sulfur Coal (LSC) and Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) plants because all appear to be able to meet Federal emission standards; however, there are emissions not covered by standards. Hydrocarbon emissions are higher and trace element emissions are lower for FBC than for conventional technologies. For FBC, based on an analytical model ... continued below

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xii, 130 p. : tables

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Argonne National Laboratory February 1977.

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  • Main Title: Preliminary Assessment of the Health and Environmental Impacts of Fluidized-Bed Combustion of Coal as Applied to Electrical Utility Systems
  • Added Title: ANL (Series)
  • Added Title: Argonne National Laboratory Report ANL-77-XX-64
  • Series Title: Argonne National Laboratory Reports

Description

The objective of this study was to assess the health and environmental impacts of fluidized-bed combustion of coal (FBC), specifically as applied to base-load generation of electrical energy by utilities. The public health impacts of Fluidized-Bed Combustion (FBC) plants are expected to be quite similar to those for Low Sulfur Coal (LSC) and Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) plants because all appear to be able to meet Federal emission standards; however, there are emissions not covered by standards. Hydrocarbon emissions are higher and trace element emissions are lower for FBC than for conventional technologies. For FBC, based on an analytical model and a single emission data point, the polycyclic organic material decreases the anticipated lifespan of the highly exposed public very slightly. Added health protection due to lower trace element emissions is not known. Although there is a large quantity of solid wastes from the generating plant, the environmental impact of the FBC technology due to solid residue appears lower than for FGD, where sludge management requires larger land areas and presents problems due to the environmentally noxious calcium sulfite in the waste. Fixing the sludge may become a requirement that increases the cost of wet-limestone FGD but makes that system more acceptable. The potential for aquatic or terrestrial impacts from hydrocarbon emissions is low. If application of AFBC technology increases the use of local high-sulfur coals to the detriment of western low-sulfur coal, a sociological benefit could accrue to the FBC (or FGD) technology, because impacts caused by western boom towns would decrease. The infrastructure of areas that mine high-sulfur coal in the Midwest are better equipped to handle increased mining than the West.

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xii, 130 p. : tables

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  • February 1977

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  • Aug. 4, 2015, 8:33 a.m.

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Argonne National Laboratory. Preliminary Assessment of the Health and Environmental Impacts of Fluidized-Bed Combustion of Coal as Applied to Electrical Utility Systems, report, February 1977; Argonne, Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc283233/: accessed October 17, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.