Booker T. Washington and the Myth of Accommodation

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Description

Since his rise to fame in the late nineteenth century, Booker T. Washington has been incorrectly labeled a compromiser and power-hungry politician who sacrificed social progress for his own advancement. Through extensive research of Washington's personal papers, speeches, and affiliations, it has become apparent that the typical characterizations of Washington are not based exclusively in fact. The paper opens with an overview of Washington's philosophy, followed by a discussion of Washington's rise to power and consolidation of his "Tuskegee Machine," and finally the split that occurred within the African-American community with the formation of the NAACP. The thesis concludes that, ... continued below

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v, 93 leaves

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Brennan, Douglas C. (Douglas Carl) December 1994.

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This thesis is part of the collection entitled: UNT Theses and Dissertations and was provided by UNT Libraries to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 449 times , with 17 in the last month . More information about this thesis can be viewed below.

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  • Brennan, Douglas C. (Douglas Carl)

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Since his rise to fame in the late nineteenth century, Booker T. Washington has been incorrectly labeled a compromiser and power-hungry politician who sacrificed social progress for his own advancement. Through extensive research of Washington's personal papers, speeches, and affiliations, it has become apparent that the typical characterizations of Washington are not based exclusively in fact. The paper opens with an overview of Washington's philosophy, followed by a discussion of Washington's rise to power and consolidation of his "Tuskegee Machine," and finally the split that occurred within the African-American community with the formation of the NAACP. The thesis concludes that, while Washington's tactics were different from and far less visible than those of more militant black leaders, they were nonetheless effective in the overall effort.

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v, 93 leaves

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UNT Theses and Dissertations

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  • December 1994

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • March 26, 2014, 9:30 a.m.

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  • April 21, 2017, 3:58 p.m.

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Brennan, Douglas C. (Douglas Carl). Booker T. Washington and the Myth of Accommodation, thesis, December 1994; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278905/: accessed June 20, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .