A Theoretical Framework of Organizational Pluralism: an Analysis of the Organizational Dimensions of Substance Abuse Programs in Selected Private Sectarian Institutions of Higher Education in Texas

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The researcher examined a relatively unexplored and limited territory dealing with higher education organizational pluralism pertaining to particalized substance abuse programs in private sectarian institutions of higher learning with student populations of under five thousand. The conceptual framework, which was a recapitulation of Lee G. Bolman and Terrence E. Deal's (1984) "multifaceted lens," applied to the human resource framework, the structural framework, the symbolic/cultural framework and the political framework in the administration of these selected substance abuse programs. The frames under which the respective substance abuse programs operate were identified by utilizing a semi-structured interview protocol. The study found usage ... continued below

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vi, 334 leaves

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Davis, Beth, 1948- May 1993.

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  • Davis, Beth, 1948-

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Description

The researcher examined a relatively unexplored and limited territory dealing with higher education organizational pluralism pertaining to particalized substance abuse programs in private sectarian institutions of higher learning with student populations of under five thousand. The conceptual framework, which was a recapitulation of Lee G. Bolman and Terrence E. Deal's (1984) "multifaceted lens," applied to the human resource framework, the structural framework, the symbolic/cultural framework and the political framework in the administration of these selected substance abuse programs. The frames under which the respective substance abuse programs operate were identified by utilizing a semi-structured interview protocol. The study found usage of management frames by substance abuse program administrators to be in agreement with Bolman and Deal's "four frames theory," with the preferred management style consistent across the frames. The administrators of the substance abuse programs prefer the human resource frame almost categorically. Each institution places a strong emphasis on recruitment of an ideal type of student, modeled after a very clear and concise institutional mission statement. The pervasive theme of the mission message seeks potential Christian leaders only. Almost exclusively, the institutions studied do not tolerate substances of any sort. The administrators interviewed were knowledgeable about the various organizational frames and expressed concerns regarding the symbolic/cultural framework. With the exception of one institution, administrators of programs believe that the Christian ethic practiced throughout their institutions is the most significant factor preventing their institutions from utilizing the political frame during times of dwindling economic resources, thus remaining congruent with the institutional mission. The institutions studied were not complex in management structure and provide relatively unambiguous environments. The students and personnel have free access to administrators of substance abuse programs, who utilize prayer and the Christian ethic as important tools in intervention. This qualitative approach captured the essence of the organizational dimensions of these substance abuse programs in the selected private sectarian institutions of higher studies in Texas.

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vi, 334 leaves

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  • May 1993

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  • March 24, 2014, 8:07 p.m.

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  • Feb. 10, 2015, 9:39 a.m.

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Davis, Beth, 1948-. A Theoretical Framework of Organizational Pluralism: an Analysis of the Organizational Dimensions of Substance Abuse Programs in Selected Private Sectarian Institutions of Higher Education in Texas, dissertation, May 1993; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc278237/: accessed October 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .