Naloxone Potentiation of Epinephrine Induced Vasoconstriction in Canine Skeletal Muscle Arteries

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Naloxone (NX) potentiated epinephrine (EPI) induced submaximal vasoconstriction in canine renal and skeletal muscle arterial segments, yet had no vasoconstrictor action alone. Developed tension generated in-vitro by 4 x 1mm. O.D. rings from 1st degree branches of canine femoral arteries was expressed as % of KCI induced maximum response. NX (10^-5 M) potentiated EPI induced submaximal contractions (34.2%) significantly more than contractions induced by norepinephrine, phenylephrine, lofexidine, ADH, KCI and serotonin (13.8,13.4,4.7,13.5,14.4 and 11.4% respectively). The NX response was unaffected by beta-adrenergic blockade and NX did not reverse an isoproterenol mediated vasodilation. Alphaadrenergic blockade with phentolamine completely eliminated EPI plus ... continued below

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ix, 140 leaves : ill.

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Stoll, Scott Thomas August 1992.

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  • Stoll, Scott Thomas

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Naloxone (NX) potentiated epinephrine (EPI) induced submaximal vasoconstriction in canine renal and skeletal muscle arterial segments, yet had no vasoconstrictor action alone. Developed tension generated in-vitro by 4 x 1mm. O.D. rings from 1st degree branches of canine femoral arteries was expressed as % of KCI induced maximum response. NX (10^-5 M) potentiated EPI induced submaximal contractions (34.2%) significantly more than contractions induced by norepinephrine, phenylephrine, lofexidine, ADH, KCI and serotonin (13.8,13.4,4.7,13.5,14.4 and 11.4% respectively). The NX response was unaffected by beta-adrenergic blockade and NX did not reverse an isoproterenol mediated vasodilation. Alphaadrenergic blockade with phentolamine completely eliminated EPI plus NX induced vasoconstriction. After washout, vessels exposed to EPI plus NX relaxed by 50% significantly faster than vessels exposed to EPI alone (18.5 and 27.9 min respectively). EPI induced vasoconstrictions were potentiated by 10^-5 M corticosterone (49.0%) which inhibits extraneuronal catecholamine uptake, but not by 10^-7 M desipramine (1.1%) which inhibits neuronal uptake. EPI induced vasoconstrictions were also potentiated by 10^-4 M pyrogallol (33.0%) which inhibits catechol-o-methyl transferase activity, but not by 10^-5 M pargyline (-1.1%) which inhibits monoamine oxidase activity. The NX effect was endothelium independent. The dose-response of various opioid receptor agonists and antagonists were compared to the NX response. A specific opioid receptor subclass could not be identified as the mediator of the NX effect. The ED_50s for NX (3.7x^-6 M) and (+)NX (8.1x^-7M) indicated a significant stereoselectivity for the (+)enantiomer. A variety of sigma receptor ligands, steroids and steroid metabolites were tested for the ability to augment EPI vasoconstrictions. Several of the opioid, sigma and steroid ligands, all with polycyclic structures, induced responses similarto those of NX. NX exerted its effect independent of traditional opiate receptors and may have influenced the cellular uptake or degradation of EPI. Endogenous compounds with sigma or steroid activity may modulate these processes in-vivo.

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ix, 140 leaves : ill.

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  • August 1992

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Stoll, Scott Thomas. Naloxone Potentiation of Epinephrine Induced Vasoconstriction in Canine Skeletal Muscle Arteries, dissertation, August 1992; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277685/: accessed September 24, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .