Regulatory Divergence of Aspartate Transcarbamoylase from the Pseudomonads

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Aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) was purified from 16 selected bacterial species including existing Pseudomonas species and former species reassigned to new genera. An enormous diversity was seen among the 16 enzymes with each class of ATCase being represented. The smallest class, class C, with a catalytically active homotrimer, at 100 kDa, was found in Bacillus and other Gram positive bacteria. In this report, the ATCases from the Gram negatives, Shewanella putrefaciens and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were added to class C membership. The enteric bacteria typify class B ATCases at 310 kDa, with a dodecameric structure composed of two catalytic trimers coupled to ... continued below

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xvi, 210 leaves : ill.

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Linscott, Andrea J. (Andrea Jane) December 1996.

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  • Linscott, Andrea J. (Andrea Jane)

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Aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) was purified from 16 selected bacterial species including existing Pseudomonas species and former species reassigned to new genera. An enormous diversity was seen among the 16 enzymes with each class of ATCase being represented. The smallest class, class C, with a catalytically active homotrimer, at 100 kDa, was found in Bacillus and other Gram positive bacteria. In this report, the ATCases from the Gram negatives, Shewanella putrefaciens and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were added to class C membership. The enteric bacteria typify class B ATCases at 310 kDa, with a dodecameric structure composed of two catalytic trimers coupled to three regulatory dimers. A key feature of class B ATCases is the dissociability of the holoenzyme into regulatory and catalytic subunits which were enzymatically active. In this report, the ATCase from Pseudomonas indigofera was added to class B ATCases. The largest class, at 480 kDa, class A, contains the fluorescent Pseudomonas including most members of the 16S rRNA homology group I. Two polypeptides are produced from overlapping pyrBC' genes. The former, pyrB, encodes a 34 kDa catalytic polypeptide while pyrC' encodes a 45 kDa dihydroorotase-like polypeptide. Two non active trimers are made from six 34 kDa chains which are cemented by six 45 kDa chains to form the active dodecameric structure. Dissociation of the holoenyzme into its separate active subunits has not been possible. In this report, the ATCases from Comamonas acidovorans and C. testosteroni, were added to the class A enzymes. An even larger class of ATCase than class A at 600 kDa was discovered in Burkholderia cepacia. Stoichiometric measurements predict a dodecamer of six 39 kDa polypeptides and six 60 kDa polypeptides. Unlike other large pseudomonads ATCases, the enzyme from B. cepacia was dissociable into smaller active forms. Both the holoenzyme and its dissociated forms were regulated by nucleotide effectors. A new class of ATCase was proposed for B. cepacia type enzymes.

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xvi, 210 leaves : ill.

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  • December 1996

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  • March 24, 2014, 8:07 p.m.

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  • June 19, 2015, 11:18 a.m.

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Linscott, Andrea J. (Andrea Jane). Regulatory Divergence of Aspartate Transcarbamoylase from the Pseudomonads, dissertation, December 1996; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc277625/: accessed October 19, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .