Video-mediated Communication in Hospice Interdisciplinary Team Meetings: Examining Technical Quality and Content

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Article on examining technical quality and content and video-mediated communication in hospice interdisciplinary team meetings.

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5 p.

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Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra Parker; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine & Washington, Karla T. 2009.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Arts and Sciences to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 130 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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Article on examining technical quality and content and video-mediated communication in hospice interdisciplinary team meetings.

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5 p.

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This study aims to determine how videoconferencing quality impacts the style and content of communication between members of hospice interdisciplinary teams and patients and their families. We videotaped video-calls between hospice teams and family caregivers based on the use of low-cost videophones. We assessed their audio and video quality using both a form that was filled out on site and a protocol for retrospective analysis. The tapes were transcribed and a content analysis was performed to assess the themes of interaction. A total of 70 video-calls were analyzed. The time spent on general informal talk was significantly correlated to the video and audio quality of the session (r=0.43 and 0.41 respectively, p<0.001). The time spent addressing psychosocial issues and on caregiver education correlated significantly to video and audio quality. This study demonstrates the potential of video-mediated communication that supports shared decision making in hospice.

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  • American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) Annual Symposium, 2009, San Francisco, California, United States

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  • Publication Title: AMIA 2009 Symposium Proceedings
  • Page Start: 135
  • Page End: 139
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

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  • 2009

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  • Feb. 21, 2014, 2:41 p.m.

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Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra Parker; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine & Washington, Karla T. Video-mediated Communication in Hospice Interdisciplinary Team Meetings: Examining Technical Quality and Content, article, 2009; [Bethesda, Maryland]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc275786/: accessed November 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.