The Sutton-taylor Feud: the Deadliest Blood Feud in Texas

One of 15 books in the series: A.C. Greene series available on this site.
Use of this book is restricted to the UNT Community. Off-campus users must log in to read.

Description

The Sutton-Taylor Feud of DeWitt, Gonzales, Karnes, and surrounding counties began shortly after the Civil War ended. The blood feud continued into the 1890s when the final court case was settled with a governmental pardon. Of all the Texas feuds, the one between the Sutton and Taylor forces lasted longer and covered more ground than any other. William E. Sutton was the only Sutton involved, but he had many friends to wage warfare against the large Taylor family. The causes are still shrouded in mystery and legend, as both sides argued they were just and right. In April 1868 Charles ... continued below

Physical Description

xii, 388 p. : col. ill.

Creation Information

Parsons, Chuck February 15, 2009.

Context

This book is part of the collection entitled: University of North Texas Press and was provided by UNT Press to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 128 times , with 4 in the last month . More information about this book can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this book or its content.

Publisher

Rights Holder

For guidance see Citations, Rights, Re-Use.

  • Parsons, Chuck

Provided By

UNT Press

The University of North Texas Press was founded in 1987 and published its first book in 1989. Though it is the newest university press in North Texas, it has quickly become a leading press with the most titles in print (more than 300) and published (15 to 18 each year). The UNT Press is a fully accredited member of the Association of American University Presses. Its books are distributed and marketed nationally and internationally through the Texas A&M University Press Consortium.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this book. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Titles

  • Main Title: The Sutton-taylor Feud: the Deadliest Blood Feud in Texas
  • Series Title: A.C. Greene series
  • Added Title: A.C. Greene Series Number 7

Description

The Sutton-Taylor Feud of DeWitt, Gonzales, Karnes, and surrounding counties began shortly after the Civil War ended. The blood feud continued into the 1890s when the final court case was settled with a governmental pardon. Of all the Texas feuds, the one between the Sutton and Taylor forces lasted longer and covered more ground than any other. William E. Sutton was the only Sutton involved, but he had many friends to wage warfare against the large Taylor family. The causes are still shrouded in mystery and legend, as both sides argued they were just and right. In April 1868 Charles Taylor and James Sharp were shot down in Bastrop County, alleged horse thieves attempting to escape. During this period many men were killed “while attempting to escape.” The killing on Christmas Eve 1868 of Buck Taylor and Dick Chisholm was perhaps the final spark that turned hard feelings into fighting with bullets and knives. William Sutton was involved in both killings. “Who sheds a Taylor's blood, by a Taylor's hand must fall” became a fact of life in South Texas. Violent acts between the two groups now followed. The military reacted against the killing of two of their soldiers in Mason County by Taylors. The State Police committed acts that were not condoned by their superiors in Austin. Mobs formed in Comanche County in retaliation for John Wesley Hardin's killing of a Brown County deputy sheriff. One mob “liberated” three prisoners from the DeWitt County jail, thoughtfully hanging them close to the cemetery for the convenience of their relatives. An ambush party killed James Cox, slashing his throat from ear to ear—as if the buckshot in him was not sufficient. A doctor and his son were called from their home and brutally shot down. Texas Rangers attempted to quell the violence, but when they were called away, the killing began again. In this definitive study of the Sutton-Taylor Feud, Chuck Parsons demonstrates that the violence between the two sides was in the tradition of the family blood feud, similar to so many other nineteenth-century American feuds. His study is well augmented with numerous illustrations and appendices detailing the feudists, their attempts at treaties, and their victims.

Physical Description

xii, 388 p. : col. ill.

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this book in the Digital Library or other systems.

Collections

This book is part of the following collection of related materials.

University of North Texas Press

Scholarly and general interest books published by UNT Press covering biography, history, culture, folklore, nature, cookery, arts, and more. Some items in this collection are restricted to use by the UNT community.

What responsibilities do I have when using this book?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this book.

Creation Date

  • February 15, 2009

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Jan. 23, 2014, 1:09 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • May 26, 2018, 5:06 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this book last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 4
Total Uses: 128

Where

Geographical information about where this book originated or about its content.

Publication Place

Map Information

  • map marker Automatically generated Place Name coordinates.
  • map marker Automatically generated Publication Place coordinates.
  • Repositioning map may be required for optimal printing.

Mapped Locations

Interact With This Book

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Purchase a Copy

Parsons, Chuck. The Sutton-taylor Feud: the Deadliest Blood Feud in Texas, book, February 15, 2009; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc271420/: accessed October 17, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Press.