Andersonvilles of the North: the Myths and Realities of Northern Treatment of Civil War Confederate Prisoners

Use of this book is restricted to the UNT Community. Off-campus users must log in to read.

Description

Soon after the close of military operations in the American Civil War, another war began over how it would be remembered by future generations. The prisoner-of-war issue has figured prominently in Northern and Southern writing about the conflict. Northerners used tales of Andersonville to demonize the Confederacy, while Southerners vilified Northern prison policies to show the depths to which Yankees had sunk to attain victory. Over the years the postwar Northern portrayal of Andersonville as fiendishly designed to kill prisoners in mass quantities has largely been dismissed. The Lost Cause characterization of Union prison policies as criminally negligent and inhumane, ... continued below

Physical Description

vii, 278 p. : col. ill.

Creation Information

Gillispie, James M. October 15, 2008.

Context

This book is part of the collection entitled: University of North Texas Press and was provided by UNT Press to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 72 times . More information about this book can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this book or its content.

Publisher

Rights Holder

For guidance see Citations, Rights, Re-Use.

  • Gillispie, James M.

Provided By

UNT Press

The University of North Texas Press was founded in 1987 and published its first book in 1989. Though it is the newest university press in North Texas, it has quickly become a leading press with the most titles in print (more than 300) and published (15 to 18 each year). The UNT Press is a fully accredited member of the Association of American University Presses. Its books are distributed and marketed nationally and internationally through the Texas A&M University Press Consortium.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this book. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Soon after the close of military operations in the American Civil War, another war began over how it would be remembered by future generations. The prisoner-of-war issue has figured prominently in Northern and Southern writing about the conflict. Northerners used tales of Andersonville to demonize the Confederacy, while Southerners vilified Northern prison policies to show the depths to which Yankees had sunk to attain victory. Over the years the postwar Northern portrayal of Andersonville as fiendishly designed to kill prisoners in mass quantities has largely been dismissed. The Lost Cause characterization of Union prison policies as criminally negligent and inhumane, however, has shown remarkable durability. Northern officials have been portrayed as turning their military prisons into concentration camps where Southern prisoners were poorly fed, clothed, and sheltered, resulting in inexcusably high numbers of deaths. Andersonvilles of the North, by James M. Gillispie, represents the first broad study to argue that the image of Union prison officials as negligent and cruel to Confederate prisoners is severely flawed. This study is not an attempt to “whitewash” Union prison policies or make light of Confederate prisoner mortality. But once the careful reader disregards unreliable postwar polemics, and focuses exclusively on the more reliable wartime records and documents from both Northern and Southern sources, then a much different, less negative, picture of Northern prison life emerges. While life in Northern prisons was difficult and potentially deadly, no evidence exists of a conspiracy to neglect or mistreat Southern captives. Confederate prisoners’ suffering and death were due to a number of factors, but it would seem that Yankee apathy and malice were rarely among them. In fact, likely the most significant single factor in Confederate (and all) prisoner mortality during the Civil War was the halting of the prisoner exchange cartel in the late spring of 1863. Though Northern officials have long been condemned for coldly calculating that doing so aided their war effort, the evidence convincingly suggests that the South’s staunch refusal to exchange black Union prisoners was actually the key sticking point in negotiations to resume exchanges from mid-1863 to 1865. Ultimately Gillispie concludes that Northern prisoner-of-war policies were far more humane and reasonable than generally depicted. His careful analysis will be welcomed by historians of the Civil War, the South, and of American history.

Physical Description

vii, 278 p. : col. ill.

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this book in the Digital Library or other systems.

Collections

This book is part of the following collection of related materials.

University of North Texas Press

Scholarly and general interest books published by UNT Press covering biography, history, culture, folklore, nature, cookery, arts, and more. Some items in this collection are restricted to use by the UNT community.

What responsibilities do I have when using this book?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this book.

Creation Date

  • October 15, 2008

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Jan. 23, 2014, 1:09 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Jan. 30, 2014, 11:28 a.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this book last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 1
Total Uses: 72

Where

Geographical information about where this book originated or about its content.

Place Name

Publication Place

Map Information

  • map marker Automatically generated Place Name coordinates.
  • map marker Automatically generated Publication Place coordinates.
  • Repositioning map may be required for optimal printing.

Mapped Locations

Interact With This Book

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Purchase a Copy

Gillispie, James M. Andersonvilles of the North: the Myths and Realities of Northern Treatment of Civil War Confederate Prisoners, book, October 15, 2008; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc271380/: accessed December 11, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Press.