Extreme Weather: Does Nature Keep Up? Observed Responses of Species And Ecosystems to Changes in Climate and Extreme Weather Events: Many More Reasons for Concern

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The authors of the report found that there were “many more reasons for concern” and specifically pointed out that “it will be impossible under such conditions of rapid climate change to uphold the UN Convention on Biodiversity’s aim to reduce the rate of biodiversity decline significantly by 2010.”It seems that extreme weather events contribute disproportionately to recently observed climate change explaining why ecological impacts have become so abundant over the last decade. In response, the authors clearly state their scientific judgment is that “efforts be made to limit the increase in global mean surface temperature to maximally 1.5 ºC above ... continued below

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60 p.:ill.

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Leemans, Rik & Vliet, Arnold van 2004.

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This text is part of the collection entitled: Environmental Policy Collection and was provided by UNT Libraries to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 34 times . More information about this text can be viewed below.

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Description

The authors of the report found that there were “many more reasons for concern” and specifically pointed out that “it will be impossible under such conditions of rapid climate change to uphold the UN Convention on Biodiversity’s aim to reduce the rate of biodiversity decline significantly by 2010.”It seems that extreme weather events contribute disproportionately to recently observed climate change explaining why ecological impacts have become so abundant over the last decade.
In response, the authors clearly state their scientific judgment is that “efforts be made to limit the increase in global mean surface temperature to maximally 1.5 ºC above preindustrial levels and limit the rate of change to less than 0.05 ºC per decade.”
In other words, there can be no further delay in reducing emissions. In fact, the scale and urgency just got bigger and greater. Global emissions must be on a steep downward trend in the next decade in order to avoid the worst impacts.

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60 p.:ill.

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Environmental Policy Collection

The Environmental Policy Collection contains reports, policy documents, and media selected from local, statewide, national, and international organizations; government and private agencies; and scientific and research institutions. The collection also contains theses and dissertations relevant to environmental policy.

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  • August 2010

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  • 2004

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  • Oct. 14, 2013, 10:54 a.m.

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Leemans, Rik & Vliet, Arnold van. Extreme Weather: Does Nature Keep Up? Observed Responses of Species And Ecosystems to Changes in Climate and Extreme Weather Events: Many More Reasons for Concern, text, 2004; c/o WWF Germany Grosse Präsidentenstrasse 10 D-10178 Berlin / Germany. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc226614/: accessed December 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .