Toward an Ecofeminist Environmental Jurisprudence: Nature, Law, and Gender

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Description

This thesis develops a legal theory reflecting the insights of feminism and environmental philosophy. I argue that human beings are not ontologically separate, but embedded in webs of relationality with natural others. My primary purposes are to 1) delineate ways in which institutions of modernity (such as law and science) have precipitated ecosocial crisis through the attempt to dialectically enforce mastery and control over nature and women; and 2) explore alternate political forms and ontologies which challenge the classical liberalist view of the (human) individual as a radically isolated, discrete, autonomous being. My overarching theme is that law functions as ... continued below

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Mallory, Chaone August 1999.

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This thesis is part of the collection entitled: UNT Theses and Dissertations and was provided by UNT Libraries to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 1428 times , with 16 in the last month . More information about this thesis can be viewed below.

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  • Mallory, Chaone

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Description

This thesis develops a legal theory reflecting the insights of feminism and environmental philosophy. I argue that human beings are not ontologically separate, but embedded in webs of relationality with natural others. My primary purposes are to 1) delineate ways in which institutions of modernity (such as law and science) have precipitated ecosocial crisis through the attempt to dialectically enforce mastery and control over nature and women; and 2) explore alternate political forms and ontologies which challenge the classical liberalist view of the (human) individual as a radically isolated, discrete, autonomous being. My overarching theme is that law functions as a narrative that can both hinder and enhance the promotion of ecological ideas, and how ecofeminism can contribute to transformative projects of environmental philosophy and feminist law.

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  • August 1999

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  • Sept. 20, 2007, 4:17 p.m.

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  • April 14, 2016, 7:51 p.m.

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Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Mallory, Chaone. Toward an Ecofeminist Environmental Jurisprudence: Nature, Law, and Gender, thesis, August 1999; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2219/: accessed April 26, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .