Attribution to Deviant and Nondeviant Social Roles

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A questionnaire was used to study causal attribution to social roles as influenced by perceived deviance of the role, instructions to identify with the role, and participant gender. The perceived deviance or nondeviance of the roles was determined by a pilot study. The roles were varied randomly through 12 hypothetical events, and identification or nonidentification instructions randomly assigned. The participants were 194 male and female university students. Participants gave the cause of each event and rated the cause on five dimensions: internality, externality, stability, globality, and controllability. Causal attribution to deviant social roles was found to result in a significantly ... continued below

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Rohlman, James E. May 1999.

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  • Rohlman, James E.

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A questionnaire was used to study causal attribution to social roles as influenced by perceived deviance of the role, instructions to identify with the role, and participant gender. The perceived deviance or nondeviance of the roles was determined by a pilot study. The roles were varied randomly through 12 hypothetical events, and identification or nonidentification instructions randomly assigned. The participants were 194 male and female university students. Participants gave the cause of each event and rated the cause on five dimensions: internality, externality, stability, globality, and controllability. Causal attribution to deviant social roles was found to result in a significantly higher across-scales score and to be more internal, less external, and more global than attribution to nondeviant roles. Participant gender showed an interaction with deviance overall and on the dimensions of stability and globality due to significantly higher ratings by women participants than those by men. Identification instructions did not produce a significant effect.

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  • May 1999

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  • Sept. 20, 2007, 1:46 p.m.

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  • April 8, 2016, 6:13 p.m.

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Rohlman, James E. Attribution to Deviant and Nondeviant Social Roles, dissertation, May 1999; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc2178/: accessed October 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .