Thermochemical Investigations of Nearly Ideal Binary Solvents. 3. Solubility in Systems of Nonspecific Interactions

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Article on thermochemical investigations of nearly ideal binary solvents and the solubility in systems of nonspecific interactions.

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4 p.

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Acree, William E. (William Eugene) & Bertrand, Gary L. June 1977.

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Article on thermochemical investigations of nearly ideal binary solvents and the solubility in systems of nonspecific interactions.

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4 p.

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Reprinted with permission from the Journal of Physical Chemistry. Copyright 1977 American Chemical Society.

Abstract: The simple model which has previously led to successful predictive equations for the partial molar excess enthalpy of a solute in nearly ideal binary solvents has been slightly modified for application to the partial molar excess Gibbs free energy (excess chemical potential) of the solute in these systems. Three predictive equations are derived and tested for their ability to predict solubility in mixed solvents from measurements in the pure solvents. The most successful equation involves volumetrically weighted interaction parameters for the excess Gibbs free energy relative to the Flory-Huggins entropy of mixing, and predicts solubility in 22 systems containing naphthalene, iodine, and stannic iodide as solutes with an average deviation of 1.5% and a maximum deviation of 4%, using no adjustable parameters.

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  • Journal of Physical Chemistry, 1977, Washington DC: American Chemical Society, pp. 1170-1173

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  • Publication Title: Journal of Physical Chemistry
  • Volume: 81
  • Issue: 12
  • Page Start: 1170
  • Page End: 1173
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • June 1977

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  • March 22, 2013, 6:09 p.m.

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  • Feb. 24, 2014, 4:07 p.m.

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Acree, William E. (William Eugene) & Bertrand, Gary L. Thermochemical Investigations of Nearly Ideal Binary Solvents. 3. Solubility in Systems of Nonspecific Interactions, article, June 1977; [Washington, DC]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc152443/: accessed November 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.