The Effect of Three Compositional Structures on the Compositional and Instructional Self-efficacy of Pre-service Music Teachers Metadata

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Title

  • Main Title The Effect of Three Compositional Structures on the Compositional and Instructional Self-efficacy of Pre-service Music Teachers

Creator

  • Author: Hauser, Christian Vernon
    Creator Type: Personal

Contributor

  • Chair: Emmanuel, Donna T.
    Contributor Type: Personal
    Contributor Info: Major Professor
  • Committee Member: Rohwer, Debbie
    Contributor Type: Personal
  • Committee Member: Taylor, Don
    Contributor Type: Personal

Publisher

  • Name: University of North Texas
    Place of Publication: Denton, Texas
    Additional Info: www.unt.edu

Date

  • Creation: 2012-08

Language

  • English

Description

  • Content Description: The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) to compare the effects of three different composition tasks with varying degrees of structure on pre-service music teachers’ creative self-efficacy as composers and their instructional self-efficacy as pedagogues of composition; and 2) to describe through pre-service music teachers’ talk perceptions of composition and their experiences completing the three composition tasks. Participants (N = 29) were music education majors from three different sized universities in the northern-central region of the United States. At the beginning of the study, the participants answered a researcher-design self-efficacy questionnaire that measured (a) their self-efficacy as composers and (b) their self-efficacy as teachers of composition. Next, they composed three compositions of various task structures (unstructured, poem, and rhythm). Immediately after completing each task they again completed the self-efficacy questionnaire. Statistically significant mean differences between the pre-task administration of the measuring instrument and all three composition tasks were found for the pre-service teachers’ compositional self-efficacy. Statistically significant mean differences were also found between the unstructured task and the rhythm task, but not between the rhythm and poem tasks or the unstructured and poem tasks. For the pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy as pedagogues of composition question, the results were also statistically significant between the pre-task administration of the measuring instrument and all three composition tasks. Statistically significant mean differences were also found between the unstructured task and the rhythm task as well as the poem and rhythm tasks, but not between the unstructured and poem tasks. Additional data were gathered through semi-structured one-on-one interviews. Through their talk the pre-service music teachers commented that they enjoyed the overall composition process. This experience also seemed to challenge the participants’ assumptions about composition and appeared to make creative experiences more tenable and relevant to their future classroom experiences. The results of this study suggest that incorporating composition activities regardless of structure within a music teacher’s pre-service training might impact their self-efficacy beliefs not only as composers, but also as pedagogues of composition. This study suggested that teacher educators might want to consider using a rhythmic structure as the first task to help provide an initial framework to guide and initiate their composition. Pre-service teachers engaged in similar compositional activities might also gain further insights about what it means to be a composer and into the pedagogy of composition.

Subject

  • Keyword: Music composition
  • Keyword: structure
  • Keyword: self-efficacy
  • Keyword: pre-service teachers

Collection

  • Name: UNT Theses and Dissertations
    Code: UNTETD

Institution

  • Name: UNT Libraries
    Code: UNT

Rights

  • Rights Access: public
  • Rights Holder: Hauser, Christian Vernon
  • Rights License: copyright
  • Rights Statement: Copyright is held by the author, unless otherwise noted. All rights Reserved.

Resource Type

  • Thesis or Dissertation

Format

  • Text

Identifier

  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc149601

Degree

  • Academic Department: College of Music
  • Degree Discipline: Music Education
  • Degree Level: Doctoral
  • Degree Name: Doctor of Philosophy
  • Degree Grantor: University of North Texas
  • Degree Publication Type: disse

Note